Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
May 18, 2012

Over the past few issues, we've followed along as Livernois Motorsports built a new 323ci Four-Valve engine for Superfly. Consisting of an FRPP Boss 302 modular block, a Livernois rotating assembly, ported '03 Cobra heads, and custom Comp cams, it made 519 hp on the engine dyno.

More importantly, and uncommon for modular engines, our new powerplant made peak power at only 6,200 rpm and peak torque at 5,000 rpm. The old engine made peak power at redline, so not only will we make more power, but we'll actually be able to use it--on the track and the street. Although engine dyno numbers are impressive, they only give an idea of how much usable power the finished product will deliver to the rear wheels.

To wrap up this overhaul, we had our new 323ci stroker shipped to Lamotta Performance in Longwood, Florida, for the swap. Just for fun, we strapped Superfly to Jake Lamotta's Dynojet chassis dyno before removing the old engine. It wound up to 5,500 rpm before it broke up so bad that Lamotta had to abort the run. Other tries after that yielded the same results, and peak output was only 306 rwhp and 285 lb-ft of torque.

Wasting no time, Lamotta removed the old engine, robbing the timing cover and cam covers from the carcass before setting it aside. He then cleaned the parts that were to be reused. We wheeled the car outside, and Lamotta's Austin Dulak cleaned the K-member and engine bay. We also took this opportunity to remove unnecessary components like the nitrous system and the old aftermarket ignition box.

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery

On the engine stand, Lamotta dressed our new long-block with a slew of new accessories. He installed new polyurethane engine mounts by Energy Suspension and new FRPP spark plug wires, all from Brothers Performance. He also installed new FRPP 34-lb/hr injectors and adapters, a Meziere electric water pump, and a PA Performance alternator. We also replaced miscellaneous components--just so everything was new--like idler pulleys, coil packs, and radiator hoses.

A few things had to be changed to accept the throttle-body placement on our new Mach 1 intake manifold. To help with this, MPS Auto Salvage sent a Mach 1 throttle cable, coolant crossover, and cruise control module. Lamotta scrounged around his shop and found a throttle cable bracket, since this is a discontinued part. He also modified the engine harness to accommodate the new locations of the IAC (idle air control valve) and TPS (throttle position sensor).

With the engine in place, Lamotta began making all the connections. He installed the stainless steel long-tube headers from American Racing Headers, followed by a new starter from PA Performance. Since our old throttle body and cold-air kit wouldn't work with the new intake, we opted for an '03-'04 Mach 1 throttle body from Accufab and a Mach 1 cold-air kit from C&L Performance. C&L also sent one of its mass air meter housings to use with our new 34-lb/hr FRPP injectors. Lamotta then wired the new electric water pump, using the power feed and relay leftover from the nitrous system.

However, we ran into a problem under the car. The "Mac Daddy" twin-disc clutch that we ordered from Centerforce was equipped with a 26-spline disc; our old T-56 has a 10-spline input shaft. A call to Centerforce assured us that our 519 hp would be more than that input shaft could handle, and it would be senseless to put a new 10-spline clutch in it (see sidebar on page 96). So Lamotta reinstalled our old clutch, pressure plate, and flywheel. Besides, it was Friday afternoon, and we were determined to bring this thing to life--it couldn't wait until Monday.

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery