Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
January 29, 2014
Photos By: Kristian Grimsland

Project cars typically have a theme, and a purpose. Here at MM&FF, we've built all-out drag cars, a road race project or two, and countless street/strip warriors. And nothing defines the purpose of a project quite like the suspension components. Soft or firm, handling or straight line, adjustable or non-adjustable, and traditional or coilover are just a few of the choices you have to make when choosing your suspension package.

The combinations are seemingly endless, so where do you start? The first thing to do is pick your theme and stick with it. If you're staying on the street, then pick street-friendly components. And if you're building a track dawg or quarter-mile monster, then go that route, but don't expect it to be street friendly. But we want Hypersilver to do a little bit of everything, and do them really well. Can we get the best of both worlds? We think so.

From the beginning of this project, we wanted to build a show-quality, street-friendly super-Fox that could hold its own on the dragstrip and open track. Yes, we knew we wouldn't be setting any records in any of those events, but we still wanted it to be respectable. To accomplish this, we turned to Steeda, QA1, and Maximum Motorsports.

We had given Steeda and QA1 the nod early on, committing to an all-around performing coilover suspension setup that could be adjusted easily to perform according to our demands, be they street, strip, or handling. Problem was, Steeda doesn't offer a K-member suited for our Windsor's geometry, and the QA1 piece is a drag-race-only piece. So, with the entire Mustang aftermarket as our oyster, we turned to Maximum Motorsports to fill in the blank.

Maximum offers full suspension kits as well as K-member/A-arm kits specialized for drag racing, street/strip, street, street/track, and serious open track/autocross. And they're all based on one versatile K-member (PN MMKM-1; $649). And it's worth every penny. It is stiff enough for open tracking or street use, but light enough to make all the drag racers happy—some 36 percent lighter than stock. And instead of opting for the forward-offset A-arms, we chose Maximum's arms for stock location. We're well on our way to getting the best of both worlds. See, it's not so hard.

1. The centerpiece of our front suspension for Hypersilver is this K-member (PN MMKM-1; $649) from Maximum Motorsports. We also chose the A-arms that place the front tires in the stock location (PN MMFCA-20; $349) and urethane bushings.
2. The K-member is as nice as aftermarket K-members come. It’s plenty sturdy for whatever we’re going to throw at it, and is some 36-percent lighter than stock. It even comes with extra holes to set your engine back 1 inch if you so desire.
3a. The lightweight but sturdy construction of the Maximum K-member is impressive, but its adjustability is even more outstanding. The lower A-arm mounts are higher than stock, improving roll center at 1-2 inches lower than stock; if you plan on going lower than that, then there’s another set of mounting points.
3b. The lightweight but sturdy construction of the Maximum K-member is impressive, but its adjustability is even more outstanding. The lower A-arm mounts are higher than stock, improving roll center at 1-2 inches lower than stock; if you plan on going lower than that, then there’s another set of mounting points.
3c. The lightweight but sturdy construction of the Maximum K-member is impressive, but its adjustability is even more outstanding. The lower A-arm mounts are higher than stock, improving roll center at 1-2 inches lower than stock; if you plan on going lower than that, then there’s another set of mounting points.

To suspend the front end, we turned to QA1 for its double- adjustable Pro Coil front strut system (PN HD601S-14175; $984.95) for '79-'04 Mustangs. The struts bolt into the stock location, are very adaptable, and are fully adjustable (ride height, compression, and rebound). The springs are 175-pound versions, which are on the soft (stock) side to ensure a good ride quality. In other words, we can set the shocks low and soft for the street and car shows, tighten them up for the open track, and loosen the fronts for the dragstrip. We also ordered Steeda's billet aluminum caster/camber plates, sway bars, and bumpsteer kit.

Out back, we purposely kept control arm mounts in the stock location, so that we could utilize off-the-shelf parts like Steeda's heavy-duty double-adjustable upper control arms (PN 555-4100; $209.95) and billet Weight-Jacker lower control arms (PN 555-4410; $419.95). We don't need the spring perches since we're utilizing QA1 coilovers in the rear as well, so we specified that when we placed our order.

And since we went with tubs in the rear, we were forced to use coilovers. So instead of being able to use QA1's direct bolt-in kit in the rear, we had to measure first with the rearend housing in place. We did this at Demon Motorsports a few months ago, if you remember. We ended up with the Pro-Rear double-adjustable system (PN DD501-12130; $779.95), which features linear-rate 130-pound (firm) coil springs and 11.63-inch double-adjustable shocks. If you still have stock shock mounts at your disposal, you can go with the rear coilover conversion kit (PN RCK52345; $850), and you'll save a lot of mounting hassle, since they bolt right in the stock locations.

In all, we have a very versatile suspension setup that will handle well, perform on the dragstrip, look cool, and ride nice. No, it wasn't the cheapest combination, but we're getting a lot of bang for our buck. Once we finish, we'll be getting on track to put these components to the test!

4. Last month, we left off with our bare (freshly painted) shell finally making it back to our in-house tech center.
5. SIM Tech Center Manager Darrell Kunda, who has been a pivotal player in the assembly of Hypersilver, turned the first wrench by installing the Maximum K-member.
6. He used the supplied lubricant to install the supplied urethane bushings.
7. He then installed them in the upper holes on the K-member.
8. Using two stock bolts for the rear mounts and the two provided bolts for the front mounts, Kunda mounted the A-arms.
9. To better our choices for brake options, we turned to Latemodel Restoration.com for its SN-95 refurbished front spindle kit (PN LRS-3105APR; $399.99). The spindles come with new hubs, bearings, and studs, and are ABS-friendly.
10. We could think of no other way to go on this project than coilovers. QA1 offers a slew of components that fit ’79-newer Mustangs, so we ordered front and rear double-adjustable coilover kits. The front Pro Coil kit (PN HD601S-14175; $984.95) is a direct bolt-in, but the rear kit (PN DD501-12130; $779.95) was a special order to accommodate our tubs.