KJ Jones
December 26, 2013
Photos By: Rick Anderson

On The Dyno

Holley Technical Sales Represent-ative Rick Anderson is the kind of guy who (if it wasn't for being married and having a family) would probably have no problem actually living in a dyno cell, spending every waking minute trying to make big steam with a Mustang. We make this assessment based on years of knowing and working with Rick, and marveling at his dedication to testing performance parts, combinations, and the like in almost every situation imaginable.

The data presented in the chart and graphs are prime examples of Rick's diligence on the dyno. With a Vortech V-11 XB110 centrifugal supercharger now installed on Project Pretty Ugly, the Pony was thrashed on the Dynojet's rollers with Rick making blower-pulley and timing-advance changes ad nauseum in an effort to make 1,000 hp with the coupe's D.S.S.-built 427 and VP Racing Fuel's MotorSport 109 unleaded.

Despite the absence of a carb cap on the throttle body and the all-important cog-drive belt for the supercharger, Project Pretty Ugly’s D.S.S. Racing 427 is ready to rock. The first dyno shot was made in naturally aspirated trim, and the engine showed impressive street/rear-wheel power and torque—especially when the losses caused by the coupe’s heavy, Brand-X, 4L80E automatic transmission (built by Performance Transmissions) are taken into account.
Despite the absence of a carb cap on the throttle body and the all-important cog-drive belt for the supercharger, Project Pretty Ugly’s D.S.S. Racing 427 is ready to rock. The first dyno shot was made in naturally aspirated trim, and the engine showed impressive street/rear-wheel power and torque—especially when the losses caused by the coupe’s heavy, Brand-X, 4L80E automatic transmission (built by Performance Transmissions) are taken into account.
Supercharger testing was done under a myriad of boost, timing, and torque-converter conditions (locked/unlocked), and the accompanying graph details how much horsepower and torque the big Vortech adds.
Supercharger testing was done under a myriad of boost, timing, and torque-converter conditions (locked/unlocked), and the accompanying graph details how much horsepower and torque the big Vortech adds.
A=naturally aspirated baseline; B=32-tooth cog, 25-degrees timing, 25 psi, locked converter; C=32-tooth cog, 27-degrees timing, 25 psi, locked converter; D=30-tooth cog, 25-degrees timing, 28 psi, locked converter; E=30-tooth cog, 27-degrees timing, 28 psi, locked converter; F= 30-tooth cog, 27-degrees timing, 28 psi, unlocked converter

As you see in the chart, columns are labeled A through F, and each letter corresponds to one of the engine/supercharger configurations that the 'Stang was tested in.

Looking back at the Mustang's first dyno test, which is detailed in our September '13 report on Ugly with its nitrous combination, we see that the drop in compression has a slight impact on the engine's naturally aspirated performance (power dropped from 471.18/peak to 440.22). However, the pistons, cam and power-adder change instantly made a profound difference. Horsepower climbed from 678.20 (with a 250hp shot of nitrous oxide), to well over 800 (just shy of the 1,000 ponies Rick is shooting for) with forced air.

Horse Sense: Drag Week. Hot Rod magazine's annual test of stamina, of both the participants, and the cars and trucks they're driving and racing over the course of a hard five days. We know firsthand how tough it is to survive Drag Week, and we're anxious to see whether Rick Anderson and Project Pretty Ugly have the right stuff. With few street miles or track laps under Pretty Ugly's belt, Rick set his sights on completing the 2013 edition.