Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
October 8, 2013

Last month, we introduced most of the components that will make up the 427ci Kaase P-38 engine that will bless the engine bay of our latest project, Hypersilver. As far as technology is concerned, this powerplant is the latest and greatest in the world of small-block Ford engines. It may not be the most powerful SBF ever built, but it will produce more than enough power for our street/track/show car—on pump gas, and with no power adder.

So exactly how much power do we expect to make? Well, according to Cliff Moore, project manager at Jon Kaase Racing Engines: “The cross-ram intake is limited to about 600 horsepower.”

If we’re even in the ballpark of 600 horsepower, we’ll be delighted, to say the least. This is a street car after all, and we’re only going to be able to harness a portion of that power on the street. It’s on track that we’ll tap into the full potential of the P-38.

Based on our experience, with that level of power production, we should see mid-10-second quarter-mile e.t.’s at just under 130 mph—pretty sick if you ask us. And on the open track, a naturally aspirated engine will be more consistent and reliable, especially with a good oiling system and adequate cooling. So, we’re obviously looking forward to getting on track. But instead of more bench racing, we need to tackle assembly of the engine.

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At Jon Kaase Racing Engines (JKRE) in Winder, Georgia, engine builder Chuck Lawrence is handling machining and assembly duties on our P-38. He is an experienced engine builder, with over 30 years of building engines under his belt, over 20 of those years building Fords. You may have heard of him before, since he raced a Mustang on the Fun Ford Weekend series for many years. He’s also built championship-winning engines for FFW and NMRA racers like Steve Ferguson and Gary “Hollywood” Parker. Beyond that, he’s one of the nicest guys in the business, so we’re thrilled about working with him on this endeavor.

This month, Lawrence is taking care of machining and prepping the block, measuring all of the components for the bottom-end, and beginning assembly of the short-block. We wanted to have the whole thing built and on the dyno, but there were just too many steps to cram it all into one. So, we’ll just wrap it up next issue, complete with dyno test.

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20. He then installed the timing set from Comp Cams, complete with the double-pinned cam gear. Next month, we’ll finish assembly and get this thing on the dyno!