Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
August 13, 2013

Last month, we started working on the rollbar for our 25th anniversary build, Hypersilver. At Demon Motorsports in Crystal River, Florida, owner/fabricator Ryan Lowther was working his skills on some 0.083 chrome-moly tubing to form a one-of-a-kind rollbar for our GT. Meant to be part of the racy/showy presentation, the bars will also serve as chassis stiffening and safety for the driver and passenger. Granted, it won’t be NHRA or IHRA legal, but this isn’t a drag car.

In fact, we’re only going to take it to the dragstrip to see what it’ll run. When it’s finished, our plan is to romp around in it on the street, dominate car shows, and make as many public appearances as possible with it in 2014 to promote MM&FF and help celebrate the Mustang’s 50th Anniversary.

Its first stop, though, will be at this year’s SEMA show. And with that imminent deadline over our heads, we’re trying to do as much of the hardcore fabrication as possible up front to make final assembly as smooth as possible. Plus, we want to get the body to paint so that our painter doesn’t feel rushed—we want the finish to be smooth as glass.

With the tubs installed and the rollbar nearly complete, we called Moser Engineering for one of its M9 housings, along with a slew of its top-of-the-line internals. Since we’re going to use stock-style control arms in the rear, we just had Moser make the housing as narrow as it could while still utilizing the stock lower control arm brackets. The overall length, housing end to end, was 50 inches. That will give us an overall width of 55 inches, axle flange to flange.

Starting at $3,337.50, the complete M9 Musclepak fabricated 9-inch rearends are as nice as rearends come. Moser will assemble it for you, complete with the powdercoating of your choice, but we wanted ours disassembled and bare metal. After we use it for mock-up, we can either powdercoat it with other suspension components or have it painted body color to match the car. We haven’t decided which we are going to do yet, so we’ll decide that later.

With the rearend in hand and bolted in place with our Steeda upper and lower control arms, we set it at ride height and measured for the installed height of our coilovers. A call to QA1 yielded us a pair of 14-inch coilover shocks (PN DD501) and a pair of 130-lb/in springs (PN 12-130). We also ordered a pair of coilover mounts from a local speed shop, the kind that Lowther is used to working with.

After mounting our coilovers, we measured for rear wheel fitment. We also moved forward and fabricated the fuel cell mount. Lowther used 1-inch, mild-steel, square tubing, boxing it in around the underside of the lip and around the bottom. Next, he’ll finish off the trunk floor around the cell and tubs. Also, the rust on the roof is worse than we previously thought, so we’re going to be replacing the roof skin with a non-sunroof piece, since we have the opportunity. We’ll do that in the next month or two.

In the meantime, we’re plugging away at the engine. We had hoped to show you at least the beginning stages of the build this month, but bulletproof engine internals are hard to get at the beginning of race season, so we’re pushing that off until next month, when we’ll bring you all the details on our 427ci Boss engine from Jon Kaase Racing Engines. You may have heard of them before …

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22. We’re also going to make some serious headway on our 427ci Boss engine build at Jon Kaase Racing Engines, so check back then.

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