Mark Houlahan
Brand Manager, Mustang Monthly
October 25, 2011
Photos By: Courtesy the Manufacturers

Inglese

If there's one induction setup that stops people in their tracks, it's an eight-stack system. From Shelby Cobras to altered-wheelbase race cars of the '60s, stacks told people you meant business-and they just looked cool! Problem was you were essentially running four two-barrel carburetors. If you think tuning one carb can be a hassle, try getting all of those carbs to play nice with each other. Today, you can have the sweetest looking engine in town with the efficiency of EFI. Inglese, a name synonymous with eight-stack induction, is now part of the Comp Performance Group (Comp Cams, FAST, RHS, ZEX, and others). Working with its sister company, FAST, Inglese was able to build a simple-to-install EFI system using the FAST EZ-EFI electronics with special EFI throttle bodies that look just like the old-school Weber carbs. So now you can have your cake and eat it too!

(866) 450-8089
www.inglese.com

EZ-EFI Eight Stack
ApplicationFord 289/302 and 351W small-block
System DescriptionIndividual 50mm throttle bodies on cast single-plane intake manifold, fuel rails, wiring harness, ECM, handheld calibration module, Dual Sync distributor
Ignition System IncludedMust provide your own coil
Fuel System IncludedMust provide fuel pump, filters, lines, fittings, and injectors
Horsepower LevelUp to 1,000 hp
OptionsFuel pump kits, fuel injectors, polished and brushed stacks in 50mm and 100mm lengths
Retail Price$3,968.24

Mass-Flo EFI

So far the EFI systems we've reviewed here have been speed density based, meaning they calculate the fuel demand via engine speed and manifold absolute pressure. Where Mass-Flo EFI differs (though the name kind of gives it away) is that it uses a mass air meter just like the OE systems on your late-model Mustang or daily driver to calculate engine load. This makes your EFI system much more flexible and can "see" engine changes such as cam swaps, head porting, and more. There's no handheld controller or laptop connection because none is needed. Mass-Flo EFI also bucks the trend of using Bosh or GM sensors and actually uses Ford sensors. OE parts you can get service replacements as close as your nearest parts store. The OE Ford ECM that drives your late-model Mustang is similar to what Mass-Flo uses for OE reliability, and if you really want to, you can custom tune the ECM via any reputable Ford chip tuner. Multi-port injection, OE sensors, mass air meter calculation, and even a retro look are part of Mass-Flo's EFI packages.

(336) 644-8668
www.massfloefi.com

Mass-Flo EFI
ApplicationFord 289/302, 351W, and 351C small-block; 429, 460, and FE big-block; 4.6L and 5.4L modular
System Description1,000-cfm billet throttle body on cast single-plane intake manifold, fuel rails, wiring harness, ECM, injectors sized to your engine, distributor, ignition coil, mass air meter assembly
Ignition System IncludedDirect plug-in Mallory distributor and matching coil
Fuel System IncludedMust provide fuel pump, filters, lines, and fittings
Horsepower LevelUp to 1,100 hp
OptionsFuel pump kits, fuel injectors, mass-air meters
Retail Price$2,994.99-$3,994.99

Professional Products

Low-cost performance intake manifolds, both for carbureted and EFI applications, have been Professional Products' claim to fame from the onset of the company. Over the years, Professional Products has expanded its line of hardware to include dampers, distributors, fuel system components, and more. The Powerjection EFI systems come in two flavors: Powerjection II is a multi-port system on a carbureted type manifold, while Powerjection III is a unique throttle body system that, at first glance, looks like your typical performance carburetor. Either system will work with a traditional air cleaner assembly for that stealth/retro look many classic car owners are looking for. Both Powerjection systems feature a self tuning Stage 3 ECM and a wideband O2 sensor with easy install exhaust clamp assembly (no welding required).

(323) 779-2020
www.professional-products.com

Powerjection III
ApplicationAny 4150-style flange intake manifold
System Description750-cfm cast throttle body, 62-lb/hr fuel injectors, wiring harness, ECM, and wideband O2 sensor
Ignition System IncludedMust provide distributor and coil
Fuel System IncludedFuel pump, fuel filter, fuel pressure regulator, and fittings (supplied in complete kit only)
Horsepower LevelUp to 550 hp
OptionsFuel pumps, Fuel on Demand returnless fuel system module (eliminates need for return line), feed and return fuel line and fitting kit
Retail Price$1,599.95-$2,099.95

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Powerjection II
ApplicationFord 289/302 and 351W small-block
System Description1,200-cfm cast throttle body on cast single-plane satin or polished intake manifold, fuel rails, 36-lb/hr injectors, wiring harness, ECM, fuel pressure regulator, fuel pump, fuel filter, wide band O2 sensor, and all sensors
Ignition System IncludedMust provide distributor and coil
Fuel System IncludedIncludes pressure regulator, fuel pump, fuel filter, and injectors, must supply fuel return line (unless optioning the Fuel on Demand system)
Horsepower LevelUp to 550 hp
OptionsFuel pumps, Fuel on Demand returnless fuel system module (eliminates need for return line), feed and return line and fitting kit
Retail Price$1,995.95-$2,095.95

Powerjection II is a multi-port system on a carbureted type manifold, while Powerjection III is a unique throttle body system that, at first glance, looks like your typical performance carburetor

Very Cool Parts

With a name like Very Cool Parts (VCP) you know that it certainly has a lot to live up to. But fear not, as VCP builds all sorts of shiny engine jewelry us mortals call "stacks" or "stack injection." If you're looking for a stack-type system with all the bells and whistles, custom set up to your engine's particulars, with plenty of build options for engine management, ignition systems, and more, VCP is the place to talk to. This is no off-the-shelf, one-size-fits-all EFI solution. No, the staff at VCP will discuss your engine's power level, your driving style, and more and spec the right hardware to build you the stack system of your dreams.

(760) 403-6266
www.verycoolparts.com

Eight-Stack EFI
ApplicationFord 289/302, 351W, and 351C small-block, 429/460 and FE big-block, 4.6L DOHC modular
System Description50mm throttle bodies on cast manifold, fuel injectors, fuel rails, linkage, harness, ECM and software
Ignition System IncludedMust provide distributor and coil, with Redline and Electromotive management it is complete with coil packs and crank trigger
Fuel System IncludedMust provide fuel pump, fuel filters, fuel pressure regulator, lines, and fittings
Horsepower LevelUp to 650 hp
Optionsstack filters, dyno tuning
Retail PriceStarting at $5,195

Fueling Around

Although some of the EFI systems we've just profiled either come with a fuel system or at least a fuel pump, most leave the fuel system up to the builder. With that said, we thought a bit of a primer (sorry, couldn't help myself on the pun!) would be in order as to choosing EFI-type fuel system components.

First off, while the typical EFI system runs at about 40 psi of pressure, nearly 10 times that of your carbureted setup, it's still designed to do the same thing, which is deliver the proper amount of fuel for the demand of the engine. In the case of EFI, the engine's demand is calculated by a series of sensors that give the ECM enough data to determine the opening and closing rates of the fuel injectors at a specific fuel pressure. Thus, the pressure needs to be right (as well as the volume of fuel) otherwise you can have a lean condition, which is not good.

Starting at the fuel pump, you can find EFI pumps in two basic configurations: in-tank, and external tank setups. In-tank is like your OE late-model daily driver, with the pump mounted inside the tank where it's cooled by the fuel around it. This setup is a bit harder to work out in a vintage car, but there are solutions through aftermarket companies to put the EFI fuel pump inside the tank. This is usually considered the best solution, as the pump lasts longer, is quieter, and isn't susceptible to fuel level issues and/or hard cornering when the tank is low on fuel.

The external pump mounts on the framerail or similar location of the chassis, so right off the bat the first consideration is mounting space/location where it will not interfere with moving suspension parts or be too close to a hot exhaust system. External pumps must be mounted below the fuel level of the tank, often making the pump one of the lowest parts of the car's profile. External EFI fuel pumps do not like to "suck" the fuel, but should be gravity fed, hence the importance of mounting location.

For fuel lines, the typical EFI system requires a feed line to the EFI manifold and a return line back to the tank. Generally, the return line is sized smaller than the feed line, as there is little pressure in the return line. Most builders simply run the same size line for both. Like a carburetor, with more power you want bigger lines. We suggest 3?8-inch ID or -6 AN line for both the feed and return. Any restriction in the return line can cause pressure issues with the EFI system, so ensure your return line has nearly zero pressure in it. If you use a rubber line for any portion of the fuel line, ensure it's rated for EFI use due to the pressure seen in these systems. Typical braided AN line or push-on hose is good for 300 psi of working pressure, but if you're plumbing from a stock vintage Ford fuel pickup to an external pump or filter and need to use regular hose and clamps, it must be EFI-rated and be sure to use EFI-type hose clamps, as they don't cut into the hose when tightened.

Finally, you'll need a fuel pressure regulator, and for good measure, grab a 0-50 or 0-100 EFI-rated pressure gauge for your build as well. The regulator is used to regulate the fuel pressure at the throttle body or fuel rails. As noted earlier, working pressure is usually 40 psi, but some systems can be tuned to higher horsepower capacity by raising the fuel pressure, providing your fuel pump has enough capacity in both pressure and volume. A typical two-port bypass regulator will fit the bill, allowing the feed line to feed the regulator's IN port, the OUT port will then feed the throttle body or fuel rails, while the regulator's return port (usually marked RET) will return the unused fuel back to your fuel tank. We'll take a more in-depth look at EFI fuel systems and building the proper system in an upcoming issue.