K.J. Jones
February 11, 2006
Steeda's Oil Separator Kit is all-inclusive and a straightforward install. While there's plenty of hose supplied for a firewall installation in an SN-95 Mustang or '03-'04 Cobra, our driver-side fender location warranted more because of the greater distances between the oil-collection tube and intake manifold to the PCV valve.

The seepage of compression and combustion gasses past the piston rings and into the combustion chamber and the chimney-style exhaust smoke it generates are telltale signals an engine is experiencing potentially serious problems. Most gearheads refer to this phenomenon as "blow-by." The compressed and burning mixture starts to leak when the rings become worn, and you should take a look at the inside of your motor before the heavy-smoke condition turns into a lot more than a new set of rings.

Older engines had crankcase vent tubes that were used to help evacuate blow-by gasses into the atmosphere, but the late-model EFI 5.0s and today's 4.6 modular engines are equipped with positive crankcase ventilation valves that suck out crankcase gasses and dispense them into the intake manifold. Naturally, sending cast-off crankcase gasses back into the combustion process isn't good for an engine's welfare, as it contaminates the intake charge. Detonation, excessive oil burning, and valve deposits are common negative results of blow-by, and high-mileage engines-as well as nitrous-injected, supercharged, or turbocharged engines (with higher cylinder pressures)-seem to be the unfortunate victims in most cases.

Steeda offers an Oil Separator Kit (PN 555-3710; $59.95), which is a simple remedy for expelling aerated oil from the crankcase and eliminating the chances of it being burned in the combustion process. It plugs into the PCV hose between the valve and intake manifold and separates oil from the recirculated air. The oil is collected in a small, glass tube that can be drained and recycled.

While this kit can be installed on Mustangs sporting any engine package, Steeda highly recommends it for the supercharged '03-'04 Cobras. We, however, thought it would be interesting to try the oil separator on a '93 5.0 'Stang with original high miles. Mustangs sporting more than 100,000 miles are still making their way across the roads of America and are susceptible to blow-by conditions, simply because of the high mileage.

Once a suitable location for installing the oil separator in the engine compartment is found (Steeda suggests a firewall installation, but that's almost impossible in the cramped confines of a stock Fox's engine bay), installing the kit is a breeze. Take a look at the photos and captions to see how you can say goodbye to blow-by-generated oil buildup in your engine.