Mark Houlahan
Tech Editor, Mustang Monthly
January 1, 2004
The GT2 comes with the main unit, a power cord with remote, an owner's manual and supplement, and two stickers (worth 10 hp each!). The device easily mounts to your windshield using three high-quality suction cups (spares are provided) and can be positioned and calibrated quickly.

We're seeing more and more Mustang owners who are looking for something beyond straight-line performance. After years of harping on the need for big brakes, supportive seats, and quick responding suspensions, people are beginning to get the picture. A well-rounded Mustang that handles the corners, stops on a dime, and has lots of power under the hood is becoming the norm-and that's a good thing.

Most people are within an hour's drive of a racetrack, which is great if you want to know e.t. and mph, but what about the ever-important 0-60 times and braking distances? Using an onboard computer is an option-if you're part of an F1 team, that is. For the rest of us average Joes, a dash-mounted performance computer is the answer.

This month we're taking a look at the new Passport G-Timer from Escort (the same company that makes Passport radar detectors). This amazing device-available in a base model as the GT1 for $149 and a more appointed model, the GT2 for $249 (which we're using here)-simply mounts to the windshield via suction cups and is powered by the cigarette lighter/power port of your Mustang. With one-touch calibration, the unit is ready to record all your most critical run data, including 0-60 acceleration, 60-0 braking distance, cornering g's, acceleration and braking g's, friction-circle g's, complete quarter-mile information (e.t., mph, 60-foot, 330-foot, and so on), horsepower, and more. The GT1 stores one run while the GT2 can store up to 10 runs. And the GT2 has the additional ability to download information to a PC or a handheld computer.