Mark Houlahan
Tech Editor, Mustang Monthly
July 27, 2017
Photos By: Mustang Owner's Museum

As the Mustang Owner’s Museum moves forward with ground breaking and construction of the much anticipated museum property just down the road from Charlotte Motor Speedway in North Carolina, some of the first vehicles to be loaned for display in the museum are being confirmed. Catch up on our previous update HERE.

The Mustang Owner’s Museum folks have shared with us the first two Mustangs to be confirmed for display will be the Ronster and the Mustang Retractable. Both vehicles are projects of Mustangs Plus in Stockton, California. The Ronster, considered to be the first mainstream Restomod build style Mustang is a 1965 that features a unique two-seater conversion. While the Mustang Retractable, built with Ford engineer Ben Smith who designed the 1957-1959 Ford Skyliner retractable top, is based off of a 1964 ½ hardtop that used a Smith-designed conversion kit for a manual folding hardtop that stows in the trunk.

The Ronster, considered by many to be the first mainstream Restomod build.

One of the most intriguing updates we’ve read from the museum staff is the implementation of a 1964 New York World’s Fair Mustang display recreation (seen as a concept drawing from Casco Signs in our story’s lead image). The idea is that this iconic image so many Mustang enthusiasts have seen over the years will create an immediate connection to the Mustang’s heritage and to the museum; being placed out front of the museum building and within the Legacy Brick Display. To further connect the Mustang enthusiast there will be the opportunity for museum guests to drive their Mustang under the display for a photo; recreating that timeless 1964 image with their own vehicle.

The Mustang Owner’s Museum will be located at 21 Carpenter Ct. NW in Concord, North Carolina, just one mile north of Charlotte Motor Speedway and less than ½ mile from Daniel Carpenter Mustang Restoration Parts. The new building, which begins construction soon, will be two stories for a total of 42,500 square feet per floor. The first floor will house the museum displays, media library, conference room, theater, and more, while the second floor will be used for storage and space for future expansion if warranted.

This Mustang Retractable Hardtop was built with the input of retired Ford engineer Ben Smith. Smith was the designer of the original retractable hardtop Fairlane in the 1950s.