Evan J. Smith
Freelancer
February 3, 2016

There are certain Ford Mustangs that we covet as the true classics—a proper Mach 1, 1969-1970 Boss 302, Boss 429, and any Shelby G.T.350 or G.T.500 to name a few. These special models represent the pinnacle of performance, collectability or coolness.

It’s easy to fine examples of these at the big shows, but if you want a chance to own one we recommend heading to the Barrett-Jackson Collector Car auction like we did this past January 23-31 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery

With over 1,500 cars crossing the block, finding amazing classic Mustangs was no surprise. We found pure originals and restored Mustangs built to perfection. In addition, there were many modified classics, some mild with nothing more than a wheel and tire swap, others with the full treatment of engine swap, body kit and custom paint. And there was even a host of late-model Mustangs, as the Jack Miller collection was presented to buyers. It featured nearly 40 S197 Mustangs, most being rare Saleen and Roush models.

Among these highly sought-after Ford collectibles was a handful of Boss 429 fastbacks from 1969 and 1970, an original 1970 Boss 302, and two Ford GT supercars—all selling at No Reserve. “Ford has been an integral part of the Barrett-Jackson family for many years,” said Craig Jackson, chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson. “That’s why we’re excited to have our Scottsdale docket filled with rare Ford performance vehicles.

We did our best to walk the rows and to catch the action as many Mustangs crossed the block. Bidding is fast and furious and we saw many smiles and fist pumps, and quite a few dejected bidders who missed their chance.

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery

Ford Motor Company was on hand with a giant new vehicle display, which included the yet-to-be released Ford GT and a cool two-car dyno set up for dyno drag racing. Adding to the amazing action was a Ride-and-Drive area, where enthusiasts could get behind the wheel of a new Ford (as well as other brands) and they could also ride shotgun for a hot lap in a new Shelby GT350.

One of the Boss Mustangs on the docket was a 1969 429 (Lot #1360). Painted in Royal Maroon, it was a single-owner car until 2014. The engine, which only has 19,500 miles, was removed from the body and both were stored for 33 years. In 2014 the Boss 429 saw a ground-up restoration. It includes the original engine and four-speed manual transmission, as well as a host of other matching-numbers parts. Documentation includes a copy of the original title and Deluxe Marti Report.

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery

One of my favorites was an ultra-rare Grabber Green 1970 Boss 429 (Lot #1400.2). There were only 500 custom-built models in this color. With only 40,900 miles since new, this matching-numbers Mustang sports the Boss Semi-Hemi engine, four-speed close-ratio transmission and “Drag Pack” 3.91 Traction-Loc rear-end. It comes with a complete set of Ford Factory paperwork, prior ownership history, restoration details, Marti Report, and Ford Motor Company window sticker.

The third 429, was a Calypso Coral 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 429 (Lot #1339.1), that was restored in 2013 by noted aficionado Arild Thu. It features its original 429 engine and transmission. Documentation includes the original Kar Kraft and Ford invoices, original sales invoice, and Marti Report.

“Each of these Fords represents a great example of American craftsmanship and engineering,” said Steve Davis, president of Barrett-Jackson. “It’s clear their owners really had an eye for detail and were willing to put the time and effort into making them truly remarkable. I’m excited to watch these cars pass to the next set of owners and see their legacies preserved.”

Photo Gallery

View Photo Gallery