Mark Houlahan
Tech Editor, Mustang Monthly
March 23, 2015

Limited-Edition Lee Iacocca Award Retiring In 2015

In 2006, a local Mustang show in Southern California was the location where the first Lee Iacocca Award was presented to that Mustang club’s President, Craig Cunningham, by Lee Iacocca himself along with Jay Leno. This first presentation was low key, with no press to document the event, and just the show’s participants in attendance. It was a humble beginning to a decade of honoring people in the classic car community who have shown, over time, their dedication to the classic car hobby, and who have done good work in supporting the hobby.

The Lee Iacocca Award, as it enters its 10th year in 2015, will be coming to an end. Mr. Iacocca feels the time is right to retire such a prestigious and coveted award, making it a “limited edition.” The Lee Iacocca Award has been an important part of The Iacocca Family Foundation’s history of raising awareness in the fight against diabetes, but doesn’t preclude honoree’s (or clubs) dedication to their individual charitable organization.

At the conclusion of 2015 the Lee Iacocca Award will have honored close to 200 of the most respected men and women in the classic car world. These enthusiasts are from all walks of life, and while some are famous, most are the “unsung” heroes who keep our hobby alive with their unwavering support. The Antique Automobile Club of America has said, “The Lee Iacocca Award is the most coveted award to win on the classic car circuit, but even with the most popular car, the greatest value is in ‘The Limited Edition.’”

Mr. Iacocca and The Iacocca Family Foundation would like to sincerely thank Bob Fria, National Parts Depot, TEK Corporation, OK Trophy, and all the clubs who’ve loyally supported the Award and what it stands for. For more please visit www.iacoccaaward.com.


Doing a Double Take

That’s not an ’11 Mustang rendering you’re looking at. It’s a ’68 Mustang coupe, converted to a fastback via a Gateway Mustang conversion kit with a Cervini’s ’11 Mustang frontend (including the fascia, hood, grilles, fenders, and headlights), and it’s the latest project from Pro Touring and auto-crossing hero Brian Finch. Primarily known as a second-gen Camaro guy (ugh), Finch has finally seen the light and joined the right team with this Mustang. With Ford Racing’s help, it’ll be powered by a Coyote with either turbos or a supercharger, suspended by a full Detroit Speed suspension, and beaten on like a rented mule at any event or track he can find. It’s currently under construction, and we hope to bring you a full feature on the car when it’s done. And maybe even a few updates along the way at www.mustang-360.com.


News Desk

DynoMax Performance Exhaust has released their 2015 catalog. Full of complete systems, builder components, and more for your Mustang, including their drone-free VT mufflers, you can get yours now at www.dynomax.com. CRC Industries, makers of cleaners and lubricants we use in our garages across the country, has launched a line of DIY videos offering instructional use, tips, and more of its products. The videos are available on the CRC website at www.crcindustries.com and on its YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/crcauto. Weld, manufacturers of premium forged aluminum street and race wheels, has hired Keith Kern to be general manager of Weld’s CCW Forged Performance Division. Kern was most recently the director of sales and marketing for Billet Specialties. Kern, who resides in Chicago, will be relocating to CCW Forged Performance’s Holy Hill, Florida, location.


Ford Racing Joins Ford SVT and Team RS, Rebranded as Ford Performance

It was 113 years ago that Henry Ford won the Sweepstakes Race against the greatest racer in the nation, Alexander Winton, which allowed him to start Ford Motor Company 18 months later due to some affluent Detroit businessmen who witnessed the feat and immediately came forward to back Henry Ford’s new venture. To say Ford’s heritage is based on racing innovations and winning is no stretch of the imagination.

Today, racing to prove new technologies, which often trickle down to the production line, is still a very big part of Ford. However, Ford’s testing on tracks all over the world has come through various performance divisions of the company, such as Ford Racing, Ford SVT, and others. Moving forward with the One Ford plan and creating world cars, such as the new ’15 Mustang, means there must be a global group that works together for future performance vehicles, technologies, and parts at Ford.

This past December Ford announced the new organization, Ford Performance. Ford Performance unifies the Ford SVT, Team RS, and Ford Racing divisions globally, serving as an “innovation laboratory and test bed” to create unique performance vehicles, parts, accessories, and experiences for customers. This includes developing new innovations and technologies in such areas as aerodynamics, lightweight materials, electronics, powertrain performance, and fuel efficiency, which can be applied across the board to Ford’s product portfolio. While Ford will be releasing 12 new performance vehicles through 2020, what this means for us vintage performance enthusiasts is a future line of assembly line–based crate engines, EFI wiring systems, and more for your restomod build. The Ford Performance organization will be led by Dave Pericak, former Mustang Chief Engineer, who has been appointed director, Global Ford Performance.


Perkins’ Rare Boss-9

While drooling over the Boss 429 cars at this year’s Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals show, we ventured into Bob Perkins’ glass-walled trailer and found this unique Boss-9 engine. Perkins told us it is a pre-production Boss 429 with cast iron heads (as opposed to the production mills’ aluminum heads), magnesium valve covers that say FORD on them, and a unique single-Dominator intake manifold and offset Boss 429 distributor. “The heads are just different enough,” Perkins said, “that you can’t interchange the valve covers or intake with the aluminum heads.” This was actually an early development engine that came from the legendary Mickey Thompson as used in one of his blue Boss 429 prototypes, and is rumored to have been used in one of the Cougar Boss 429s that the Mercury division built.