Ford Drag Racing
Henry De Los Santos
Mustang360 Network Content Director
January 1, 2015
Photos By: Total Cost Involved Engineering

It’s been said the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. In my case, I’ve swaggered a few different ways, only to come full circle. MM&FF is where I almost started my career nearly 15 years ago.

Back in the day, I was the second hire at the National Mustang Racers Association and did freelance work for them. Then in June 2000, after I graduated from the University of California, San Diego, former MM&FF editor Jim Campisano offered me a staffer position. Unfortunately, back then I just wasn’t ready to pack my bags for New Jersey. Instead, I relocated two hours north and ended up taking a gig with Car Craft magazine and becoming the token Ford guy.

It was during my tenure at Car Craft that I built my first heads-up car. It was a supercharged ’89 Fox built according to the EFI Renegade rules at the time, meaning it had to have a hydraulic roller camshaft with a maximum .550-inch lift. I’ll never forget my first hit, which was a 10.02 at 140-mph thrill ride. Boy, was I hooked! Honestly, I didn’t expect to go that fast during the initial outing, and after one more pass I was told to slow it down or park it since I didn’t have my competition license. That ended my weekend, but even so, I had a mile-wide grin on my mug and I was OK with that.

Since then I ventured onto a different magazine for nearly 12 years and kept to my Blue Oval roots with another Mustang, a ’90 Fox that is way beyond anything I ever dreamed of. Like most projects, it started out relatively mild, running 8.90s the first time out. However, over the past few years it has evolved into something a bit more intense. It’s a stock suspension based ride and the first West Coast car on 275 drag radials to run 6s in the quarter-mile at over 203 mph. It was no easy feat, but we have a great team that made it happen.

As for what I see in the near future for MM&FF, we’ll showcase the hardcore tech you’ve come to expect. This includes potent engine builds ranging from the traditional 5.0L to the latest iterations, along with power-adder testing on both engine and chassis dynos. And of course we’ll continue to feature the hottest rides out there and be onsite at the main events.

More importantly, while I feel fortunate to be at the helm of this ship, I know that this is ultimately your magazine. If there’s something you would like to see or just feel the need to reach out, you can email me directly at finish.line@enthusiastnetwork.com. And with that, let the fun begin!