Dale Amy
September 1, 2005
Photos By: Courtesy Of PHP

Horse Sense:
Mr. Roekle unearthed a set of scales from some dusty corner of the PHP shop and set about weighing the new brakes versus the factory's. The drag brakes save about 35 unsprung or rotating pounds up front, and a further 28 out back. These rotors are purpose-built for the quarter-mile, having tremendous stopping power, but insufficient mass for repeated stops Installation is straightforward, though the front spindles will require modification to mount the new four-piston calipers

You're probably getting tired of hearing it by now, but the '05 Mustang GT is undeniably more capable than its predecessors in just about every way, including braking, what with its sizeable four-wheel discs. Great news for all-around performance, but not so great for serious drag racers. Why? Because traditional 15-inch drag rims for skinnies and slicks simply won't fit over the new binders, front or rear. The problem is not so much rotor diameter as offset and caliper mass, according to quarter-mile maven Paul Svinicki, the big shoe at Paul's High Performance, who was among the first to recognize the issue. So, naturally, he was also among the first to come up with a solution: an '05 Mustang drag race four-wheel disc brake kit crafted to PHP specifications by Wilwood Engineering.

Let us repeat these are drag brakes, not recommended for regular street use because of their ultra-lightweight steel rotor design. These rotors are purpose-built for the quarter-mile, having tremendous stopping power, but insufficient mass for repeated stops. They're bolted to deep, forged-aluminum, hub-section hats that inset the rotor and forged-billet calipers, thus providing clearance for 15-inch drag rims. And, man, are they light-the PHP/Wilwood kit saves about 63 pounds of unsprung mass in comparison to factory cast-iron rotors and beefy calipers.

Installation is straightforward, though the front spindles will require modification to mount the new four-piston calipers. Tag along as PHP's master wrench Karl Roekle shows us how it's done.

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