Mark Houlahan
Brand Manager, Mustang Monthly
November 4, 2011

More and more people are driving a classic car nearly every day for the commute to work, college, errands, and so on, but it can be a harrowing experience for some. Substandard brakes, thin steering wheels, uncomfortable non-locking seats, and more (all by today’s vehicle standards) can mean just half an hour of driving your classic Mustang or Ford can really be a workout. While you’ll never achieve today’s five-star crash certification in a classic Mustang, even with the upgrades we’re about to walk you through, you will be much better off tackling some of these changes/updates to your ride if it sees a lot of street use.

You might be thinking that increasing the safety and reliability of your classic Mustang or Ford isn’t high on your project list, even if you only drive it to a few select events and club functions, but you’d be wrong. With today’s increased number of drivers on the road, many driving with distractions such as eating, talking on the phone, or the worst, texting, just being on the road in your Mustang or Ford paints a target on your decklid. We hope you don’t think we’re using scare tactics here, but we’ve seen enough classic Mustangs involved in crashes to know that just some basic upgrades, many that can be incorporated during a build or even on a completed car, would have made a big difference between walking away from a crash and being carried away by EMTs.

All you have to do is take one look at our current project car, Project Generation Gap, to see we practice what we preach. Our ’68 Mustang project is benefitting from such safety improvements as power disc brakes, high-back locking seats, three-point seatbelts, a collapsible steering column, and more to keep the owner safe. The ’68 will be a “near” daily driver, only being parked during bad weather or when it would be unwise to leave it unattended (public event, airport parking, and more), so we wanted to incorporate as many safety enhancements as we could to keep anyone inside the car safe. Check out the following captions, as we hope they inspire you to not only build a safer classic Mustang or Ford, but be a more attentive classic car driver—one that hopefully can prevent the accident in the first place.

All you have to do is take one look at our current project car, Project Generation Gap, to see we practice what we preach.

Seating

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Braking

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Lighting

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Crash Safety

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Distracted Driving

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