K.J. Jones
January 23, 2006
Extreme Automotive's Saul Gutierrez pops the Speed of Sound A-pillar gauge pod into position in Shawn Roberts' '04 Mustang GT.

Boost and fuel are two of the more closely monitored pressure values associated with supercharged or turbocharged 'Stangs, and the A-pillar has been the longtime preferred location for mounting gauges that record those pressures.

A-pillar gauge brackets, better known as "pods," are the vacuum-formed, plastic interior trim pieces that install along the driver side of a Mustang's windshield. Gauge pods usually hold two or three 211/416-sized gauges and are designed to give those gauges a Top Gun look inside the cockpit. On the whole, they make a cool enhancement to a 'Stang's interior. But many of the popular A-pillar pods are slightly obtrusive because of their size and, depending on a driver's seating position, can create a blind spot along the left side of the windshield.

Speed of Sound is a Memphis-based company that's fairly new on the Mustang scene. Company co-owners Alan Lindgren and Mike McHughes have developed a series of custom gauge pods for '94-'05 Mustangs ($119.99 plus shipping; coupe and convertible) that are unique and nothing like the bulky, industry-standard pieces used by many of us to achieve the jet-fighter attitude inside our 'Stangs.

We decided to do a little A-pillar-panel swap of our own, using Shawn Roberts' soon-to-be turbocharged '04 Mustang GT coupe as our recipient vehicle. We also installed electrical boost (PN 883224; $209) and fuel-pressure (PN 883225; $209) Competition EL gauges from Faze Performance Instruments to complete the project. Saul Gutierrez of Extreme Automotive in Canoga Park, California, performed the panel surgery and gauge installation in roughly two hours.

The Speed of Sound A-pillar gauge pod is a 100 percent direct replacement for the factory trim panel and is a functional eye-catcher. The bullet-shaped gauge cups sit closer to the dash cover than cups on other A-pillar panels, so vision along the left side of the windshield isn't compromised. And when combined with Faze's electroluminescent gauges, the setup looks totally bitchin' when the light gets low.