Kristian Grimsland
Associate Editor, Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords
April 8, 2013

The long, exhausting process of building your muscle Mustang or fast Ford motor is finally over, fabrication and installation of new parts is done, the transmission finally fits, and you see the light at the end of the tunnel. However there's one thing left—fuel.

Deciding on a fuel system can be challenging. What fuel-pressure regulator should you use? What size fittings do I need? Do I want a return-style or returnless fuel system? These are all good questions to ask yourself when it's time to supply fuel. But where do you start? Luckily, Aeromotive gave us an easy solution.

In recent articles, you've seen the extensive time and work we've been dedicating to our Coyote coupe project. When we first began it was nothing much more than a giant paperweight. No nut or bolt has been left unturned since we got our hands on it, and we are excited to see it come together.

Editor Smith wanted a track-ready Fox that he could not only hit the strip with, but also drive to the office or local car shows. Backing up our Coyote 5.0L, is a Tremec Magnum T56 six-speed transmission and Science Friction Stage 2 clutch supplied by American Powertrain. Kenny Brown Performance sent us one of its Advance Geometry System (AGS) 5.0 suspension kits, and inside we installed a Scott Rod Fabrications rear-seat delete.

Building a show-stoppin' street menace and track performer takes a lot of time and money. We wanted everything to be perfect with our coupe, and as we continue the build, the details are starting to pay off.

The next big project for our Coyote was the fuel system. This was a critical step in our build, and to make sure we had enough fuel for our future goals, we contacted Aeromotive. Aeromotive sent us its new and revised A1000 Stealth Fuel System for '86-'95 5.0L Mustangs

You might remember our Three-Valve transplant story (Mar. '11) , where Pete Epple installed Aeromotive's Stealth Fuel System (PN-17147) into his Three-Valve–equipped Fox-body. Epple utilized a stock Fox-body gas tank with a welded sump already installed by Aeromotive. Inside the sump sits an A1000 fuel pump and fuel filter.

Aeromotive did a fantastic job creating a complete kit that could handle more than 1,000 hp, but the word stealth doesn't necessarily hold true to its meaning. Due to the sump's location, the fuel pump, filter, and lines were visible when driving down the street, and the fuel pump created a lot of noise. Racers looking for the sleeper look wanted a better option. To fix this problem, Aeromotive's new Stealth A1000 fuel system (PN 17130) features a revision to the gas tank in contrast to Epple's sumped tank. The new gas tank mimics the factory '03-'04 Cobra one and features an internal A1000 fuel pump.

According to Jesse Powell from Aeromotive, "The old sump version worked great, but the problem was it was big and bulky, and could be heard on the street. It wasn't hidden or quiet."

"The great thing about our new kit is that the pump and lines are hidden, it's quieter, and the fuel is cooler," said Powell. "You can buy just the tank if needed, or pump if you already have a '03-'04 Cobra tank. But if you're looking for an all-in-one kit with everything you need to plumb a fuel system, our Stealth kit has it all."

For our Coyote coupe we opted for the complete kit, which includes a Cobra-styled gas tank, an A1000 fuel pump, fuel filter, fuel pressure regulator, and all the needed lines and fittings to plumb a return-style system. The entire kit cost about $2,200. We wanted our coupe to look as clean as possible, and we think this kit did the trick.

Follow along as we take you through the installation process of plumbing a return-style fuel system and get one step closer to firing up our Coyote coupe.

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