Michael Galimi
July 15, 2011

It was without a doubt the more challenging part of the installation. D'Amore used a special cutter that made the front cover look as if Ford cast the piece with the shortened bosses and cut ribs. It added more time to the installation, but the custom cuts were a nice touch.

Dmytrow alluded earlier that parts of the system are a carryover from the previous Roushcharger system for the 4.6L Three-Valve, but the team did have to design several other parts and pieces. In addition to the new FEAD, Roush designed new fuel rails, fuel injectors, throttle spacer, wiring, and PCV and vacuum systems. The supercharger housing is a new casting to fit properly under the hood and on top of the engine. The intake manifold is new, given the new head design on the Coyote 5.0L, but the same air-to-water intercooler is utilized. The lines, intercooler pump and mount, heat-exchanger, reservoir, and all the little other parts and pieces are a direct carryover from the Three-Valve since the electric fan, radiator, chassis, and bumper are identical to the 2010 model.

The system was installed out-of-the-box, save for a custom JDM tune. "We could change the pulley for more boost or add headers and X-style exhaust, but we would be pushing the fuel system past its capabilities," commented D'Amore. He says those limits are 520 rwhp for auto cars and approximately 560 rwhp for a manual-transmission-equipped Coyote 5.0L.

The Roushcharger comes with a set of 47--lb-hr fuel injectors, but relies on the stock fuel pumps. He continued: "We are designing an easy-to-install fuel system and eventually we will be upping the boost, adding exhaust, and bolting on a larger throttle body and elbow."

The kit produced a peak of 7.8 psi of boost on the completely stock engine (right down to the factory headers, catalytic converters, and mufflers). The Roushcharger brought output to an impressive 510 rwhp and 476 lb-ft of torque. Due to deadlines we didn't get over to Englishtown Raceway Park or Atco Raceway for on-track results, but that will happen in the near future.

"Typically a street car with an automatic and that level of power will go 10.90s with a good set of tires," notes D'Amore. We agree with his assessment based our own experience with several different project vehicles.

Keep tuned to these pages as we plan on following along as D'Amore gets after this '11 Mustang GT with more boost and power.

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