Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
November 17, 2010

Chris Johnson of SCT showed up at MM&FF headquarters with the chip and selector switch (included), the programming software ($349), and a chip programmer. The programmer (PN 7500) is separate and costs $300. On our Dynojet at the Source Interlink Tech Center in Tampa, a baseline pull yielded 262 rwhp and 287 lb-ft of torque.

After disconnecting the battery to clear the ECM's adaptations, power increased to 265 hp and torque to 291 lb-ft. "As you drive the car on the street, the computer learns and adapts to the conditions," says Johnson. So when we disconnected the battery, the computer was reset to factory settings-and a 3 rwhp and 4 lb-ft increase resulted.

The next step was to burn the tunes to the chip. Johnson downloaded the tuning software onto our computer and began picking tunes for our application. A mild naturally aspirated tune is already burned to the chip, so Johnson modified another version of that same tune by retarding the timing to 14 degrees; he burned it to the chip as well.

Now we can get the best of our engine with maximized timing and with the flip of a switch, turn on our nitrous-friendly tune. As an added safety feature, Johnson raised the idle of our nitrous tune to 1,200 rpm, so we know that it is on just by how the car idles.

Next, Johnson disconnected the negative battery cable and removed the ECM from its home behind the right kick panel. He then removed the computer cover, cleaned the terminals on the port, and plugged in the chip. The switch comes with a long cable, which plugs into the chip for easy placement anywhere in or under the dash (or console).

On our street tune, we made another pull on the Dynojet, which resulted in 273 rwhp and 304 lb-ft of torque-an 8hp and 13 lb-ft increase.

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