Michael Galimi
December 31, 2009

The company also added a Ford Racing dual GT500 fuel pump setup with a matching dual fuel pump driver module (FPDM). This setup is super-simple and fits like a factory-produced item. A set of eight 60-lb/hr injectors were added to ensure fuel delivery isn't a concern. Also included in this spartan setup is the Competition Inlet Kit, which features an open-air element and a PMAS MAF sensor. The basic Edelbrock kit comes with an optional 3-year/36,000-mile warranty, but the tuner-kit doesn't carry that option.

These mods were done because the customer wants more than the advertised 466 hp and 439 lb-ft of torque (at the flywheel) and 5 psi output. That equals approximately 410 rwhp if you use a rough 12-percent conversion for a manual transmission-equipped Mustang. JDM increased the boost by swapping the blower pulley from the standard 3.875-inch to a 3.250-inch. That brought the boost from 5 psi to a tire-scorching 14.5 pounds. "The boost went to 11-12 nearly instantly on the dyno, and then went up to 14.5 in the upper rpm range. The peak boost was due to the restrictive exhaust system," commented Jim D'Amore III. The results were an outstanding 519 rwhp and 489 lb-ft of torque. The elder D'Amore dialed in a mild 16 degrees of ignition timing for use on pump gas. The torque results caught our eye, and JDM's Shaun Lacko commented, "Jim III's yellow Saleen makes way more torque with the Edelbrock blower than any of the twin-screw combos-and they all have similar engine combos."

On-Track Testing The chassis dyno testing netted some awesome results, but we wanted to see how this car did on the quarter-mile. JDM is practically around the corner from Old Bridge Township Raceway Park (Englishtown, New Jersey), so we popped in for a few quick runs. Carlisle's goal was a 10-second pass with the near-stock engine and supercharger. Knocking off 519 rwhp was near enough to accomplish that task, but D'Amore faced an uphill battle due to the road-race-inspired suspension and stock clutch. The car did have a set of 3.73 gears to help it accelerate quicker.

For track testing, the 20-inch rear wheels were traded for OEM 17-inch Bullitt wheels wrapped in Mickey Thompson ET Street (26x11.50) DOT slicks (set at 16 psi). These are the same tires we have used to test everything from a 10-second Shelby Super Snake to a 12-second Two-Valve project car. The sticky compound, decent sidewall, and shorter overall height (than a stock tire and most 20-inch wheel/tire combos) helped this 3,850-pound Mustang stick to Englishtown's starting line and run hard down the track. The intense torque curve requires sticky rear tires, otherwise you will be left spinning.

D'Amore left rather mildly (3,000 rpm) on his first hit to create a baseline and see if the car would hook. The E-Force-equipped Stang launched with ease (1.89 60-foot time) as the tires spun out of the gate. The front end would barely lift as he stabbed the throttle and let the clutch out. D'Amore power-shifted the five-speed trans and the Edelbrock blower screamed to the finish line with an 11.78 at 122.4 mph.

D'Amore got more aggressive on the starting line after a brief cooldown. This time he left higher (4,500-5,000 rpm), knocked off a 1.73 60-foot time, and breezed through the lights in 11.41 seconds at 123.6 mph. That would hold up as the best pass of the day, but there is potential for quicker runs. D'Amore felt he needed more time to dial in the car, but the stock clutch definitely wasn't going to last as he hot-lapped it a few times. The big power started to take its toll on the clutch and he wisely said enough was enough. He made one last run, which produced a 1.63 60-foot, but the clutch was hot and he missed Third gear. D'Amore stayed with it and ran 11.97 at 119.

With the horsepower and torque results we saw with the E-Force system, it's evident that with a little more work this car will run in the 10s with its stock long-block, and that would equal one happy owner.

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