KJ Jonesx
April 22, 2012

Thankfully, those issues are cleared up and there are several aftermarket companies that now produce almost all of the hard parts necessary for installing Coyote 5.0 engines in '79-'95 Mustangs. And, with the engines being as power-adder compliant as they are, this latest segment of engine swaps creates a huge potential for enthusiasts to build wicked street Ponies, with 5.0-liter power that goes far beyond the 215-235 horses of the pushrod originals.

SN-95/New Edge Three-Valve

It's hard to believe the process of swapping a 4.6-liter Three-Valve engine into an SN-95 Mustang is actually 6 years old. That's right. Logan Motorsports performed this exchange back in 2006 (with a kit that required locking out the engine's variably timed camshafts), and since that time the company has been working on a package that makes the effort a lot simpler.

As at-large-editor Tom Wilson noted in a prior essay on engine swaps, "The Three-Valve is an excellent performer and readily available." This broad availability--these days through wrecking yards/auto dismantlers, Mustang shops and the Internet--and the engine's inexpensive price definitely make it a cost-effective mod-motor for installing in non-S197 Mustangs.

Thanks to prevalent aftermarket support for Three-Valves, this swap has come of age. And with the reduced weight, improved gas mileage, and performance increase it brings (for less than the price of the average supercharger system), we see this swap as a no-brainer for anyone looking to upgrade the tired Two-Valve engine in a '96-'04 Mustang GT.

New Edge SOHC 5.4

If you're looking for comparisons in the pushrod/modular engine-swap universes, the best way to look at the '99-'04 4.6 to 5.4 Two-Valve upgrade is as a modern-day 5.0-to-351W swap. While engine-in/engine-out is the physical comparison, the instant (and significant) torque increase is the shared result of each transplant.

Because the two PI Two-Valve modulars are generally built from the same stock (they even share similar engine internals such as crank, pistons, heads and cams), their accessories such as oil pan, and water pump are interchangeable, right down to their mounting locations. The big exceptions are the intake manifold and a '99-'04 Mustang's exhaust, which requires significant H-pipe modification for proper fitment.

This archived dyno chart presents a look at the gains, especially torque increase, that typically come from swapping a stock, Two-Valve 4.6-liter with an equally OEM 5.4-liter engine. It's important to note that for this test, despite the similar configuration of both engines, peak power comes at a lower rpm with the modified (with adapters) intake on the 5.4, as compared to the peak-power range of the 4.6.

4.6 Baseline5.4 BaselineGains
RPMTorqueRPMTorquePowerTorquePower
2,500236.5112.6306.2145.769.733.1
2750245.2128.4301.2157.756.029.3
3,000251.0143.4299.1170.848.127.4
3,250251.0155.3295.9183.144.927.8
3,500253.3168.8287.5191.634.222.8
3,750254.0181.4283.0202.029.020.6
4,000253.5193.1276.5210.623.017.5
4,250253.3205.0266.0215.212.710.2
4,500237.5203.5239.8205.52.32.0
4,750226.7205.1218.6197.7-8.1-7.4
5,000212.7202.5199.1189.6-13.6-12.9
5,250196.9196.8178.6178.5-18.3-18.3
5,500181.9190.5157.3164.7-24.6-25.8
5,750167.7183.6128.5140.7-39.2-42.9

5.4 TunedTotal Gains
PowerTorquePowerTorquePower
2,500329.7156.993.244.3
2,750321.3168.276.139.8
3,000317.2181.266.237.8
3,250314.6194.763.639.4
3,500306.3204.153.035.3
3,750296.9212.042.930.6
4,000290.7221.437.228.3
4,250277.2224.323.919.3
4,500263.7226.026.222.5
4,750247.0223.420.318.3
5,000230.5219.417.816.9
5,250212.9212.816.016.0
5,500190.8199.88.99.3
5,750162.6178.0-5.1-5.6

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