KJ Jones
Brand Manager, 5.0 Mustang & Super Fords
June 15, 2010

Many of us live and breathe through modifying our Mustangs. Seriously, the hobby truly is a way of life for hardcore 'Stangbangers. However, we realize that despite the desire to go for performance gusto in one fell swoop, economic concerns oftentimes dictate that certain upgrades be made in stages.

We've communicated many times the importance of having a fuel system that is capable of supporting the big-time horsepower (more than 700 hp at the feet) and torque that many enthusiasts aspire to in street-driven, pump-fueled EFI Mustangs. For '99-'04 'Stangs specifically, all roads ultimately lead to doing away with the factory's fuel plumbing and installing a return-style fuel system (where the primary fuel line is run forward from the tank, split into two separate lines that feed gas to each fuel rail independently, and then returns it to the tank via a line that exits a bypass regulator).

Return-style fueling guarantees an engine has a continuous supply of constantly flowing, evenly pressurized cool fuel. On supercharged Ponies, it has proven to be the best way to ensure the engine is getting enough gas when the hammer is dropped and boost increases.

In our opinion, when you're going after the big, big steam, cost should not be cited as a reason for pushing fate with the factory fuel system. However, we do understand how crucial wise financial choices are these days, so we were happy to receive word of two new parts from Fore Precision Works-a billet, dual-pump fuel hat (PN 037-015; $425) with an adapter that allows retention of the stock fuel line (PN 037-022; $55). The setup brings budget-minded New Edge owners a step closer to hopping up their stock fuel system for moderate power increases, and then easily upgrading to a full-on aftermarket setup-AN -8 line, AN -6 return, regulator, and so on-later (i.e., when the funds are available to do it).

Los Angeles-area '04 Terminator owner Manny Huerta aspires to someday take his Snake into the big-power zone of 600-plus at the feet. For now, Manny is OK with the impressive 560 rear-wheel horses that his Cobra currently puts down thanks to a Kenne Bell 2.3 supercharger, a CAI, and a free-flowing exhaust.

However, being OK with that power doesn't mean Manny isn't aware that he is closing in on the limits of his OEM fuel pumps' ability to support it. So, with that in mind, we're dropping a pair of Ford GT fuel pumps in the Cobra's tank, using the aforementioned hat and stock-line adapter.

For time and photo purposes, Mason Rowland of B&D Racing in Van Nuys, California, is spinning the wrenches for us on this project, but the upgrade definitely is one that can be accomplished at home provided you have a means of safely raising your car enough to lower the fuel tank and perform the minor surgery.

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