KJ Jones Senior Technical Editor
January 26, 2010
Photos By: Courtesy Of Holley

Horse Sense:
C'mon, now, you didn't seriously believe Nitrous Oxide Systems would be part of a project that doesn't involve juice, did you?

In our Feb. '07 issue, we filled you in on the '90 Mustang GT being produced by Nitrous Oxide Systems ("Boosted Energy," p.148) to compete against a Lexus SC 300 in Fuze Beverage Company's four-category performance challenge for domestic-versus-import supremacy.

The 'Stang has to prove its superiority over the ricer on the dragstrip, the drifting circuit, the parking lot (autocrossing), and in the show 'n' shine display paddock. This battle of preferences has been ongoing for what seems like centuries, so it will be cool to see how the competition plays out. Smart money is on the Mustang, all the way.

NOS engineers have put together a rejuvenated powerplant for their Fuze Fighter 'Stang that includes parts from the catalogs of nearly all of the Holley-owned companies- including NOS, of course-that will hopefully make it triumph over the Lexus.

In our initial report, we focused on the installation and dyno flog of Weiand's 174 supercharger system. The rules limit the GT to 600 rwhp, and its stock-block 347 covered more than half that amount (382 hp/352 lb-ft of torque) with the added bolt-on huffer and Holley throttle-body fuel-injection system.

We don't think this project car will be signed off as complete if it isn't influenced by nitrous oxide in some way, shape, or form; NOS decided to use its proven Cheater nitrous-oxide system to make up the horsepower deficit and bring the GT closer to the 500hp mark, which is enough power for the multitasking it has to do when it goes toe-to-toe with the Lexus.

Contrary to general-and uneducated-belief, adding nitrous to the supercharged engine will not cause the bullet's immediate demise. NOS says the Cheater kit, when jetted for 50 hp, is safe and will lower the blower's temperature. The lower temp promotes a denser air charge, which should tack on an additional 75 hp at the rear wheels.

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NOS techs are also outfitting the 'Stang with FJO Racing Electronics' wideband O2 sensor and gauges, and an MSD ignition system, including the popular 6AL spark box, Blaster coil, and a performance distributor cap. These accessories are recommended when nitrous oxide or multiple power adders are being used on an engine, as the FJO wideband allows you to fine-tune air/fuel for maximum performance. In this case, it is done by working in conjunction with Holley's Commander 950 fuel-management setup to richen up the mixture.

Here are the photos to walk you through this last stage of the import-slayer's engine upgrades. An NOS remote bottle opener, an automatic bottle heater, and a purge valve are added as final touches, which contribute to making this boosted and juiced 347 a force to be reckoned with when the 'Stang and the Lexus square off later in the year.

Management Material
Anyone who uses or has ever used a power adder is aware of the havoc detonation can cause inside an engine when the air/fuel levels aren't optimum or spark isn't sufficient.

In an effort to protect the 347 from damage caused by a lean air/fuel mixture, NOS engineers enhanced the 'Stang's ignition system with MSD's popular 6AL box and a Blaster coil, along with a performance distributor cap.

FJO Racing Electronics offers a wideband O2 sensor and data-logging controller unit that is operated in conjunction with the stroker's Com-mander 950 fuel-injection system. Having this type of control, and being able to monitor air/fuel and boost information with FJO's digital gauges allows for precise tuning, thus proving that nitrous oxide and superchargers can peacefully coexist on the same engine.

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ON THE DYNO
  BLOWER BLOWER AND NITROUS DIFFERENCE
RPM POWER TORQUE POWER TORQUE POWER TORQUE
4,400 288.03 343.81 n/a n/a n/a n/a
4,500 295.04 344.35 298.66 348.16 3.62 3.81
4,600 303.13 346.10 332.21 379.14 29.08 33.04
4,700 308.04 344.22 364.82 407.64 56.78 63.42
4,800 312.05 341.45 382.73 418.78 70.68 77.33
4,900 317.35 340.16 393.24 421.50 75.89 81.34
5,000 325.72 342.15 398.06 418.14 72.34 75.99
5,100 332.09 342.00 403.60 415.63 71.51 73.63
5,200 340.04 343.45 408.30 412.40 68.26 68.95
5,300 347.46 344.32 413.07 409.34 65.61 65.02
5,400 352.87 343.21 418.09 406.64 65.22 63.43
5,500 357.77 341.64 427.66 408.39 69.89 66.75
5,600 367.04 344.24 434.17 407.19 67.13 62.95
5,700 371.94 342.72 439.20 404.69 67.26 61.97
5,800 373.75 338.45 443.15 401.29 69.40 62.84
5,900 375.98 334.69 447.18 398.08 71.20 63.39
6,000 381.15 333.64 451.08 394.85 69.93 61.21
6,100 380.81 327.89 455.08 391.83 74.27 63.94
6,200 374.35 317.10 456.04 386.33 81.69 69.23

OK, when it's all said and done, did the blower/nitrous combo yield any more power? Yes, it did; it also ramped up the torque figure nicely. A 50-shot of juice brought total rear-wheel horsepower to 456 at 2,600 rpm, almost 75 horses more than the 382 the Weiand supercharger produced on its own.

The stroker's torque figure also climbed, thanks to the nitrous, and the acceleration the increase generates should be a big factor in the 'Stang's success when it is put through its paces in the three performance categories of the competition (dragstrip, autocross, and drifting).