KJ Jones
February 4, 2014

Horse Sense: Ahhhhhh, the sparkle of bling. Be sure to take a moment to notice the brilliant finish on the ProCharger P-1SC-1 centrifugal head unit that's showcased in this report. Like all of the street- and race-only centrifugal blowers in the company's deep arsenal, this unit started life with the factory's standard Satin finish. Polished brightness is available from ProCharger as an option, which we think is well worth the additional cost.

The '05-'10 Mustang GTs really need more acceptance as 'Stangs to consider, when funds are tight and you're shopping for a newer Pony. While this opinion isn't intended to take any of the much-deserved thunder away from Coyote-powered rides, we're disappointed by what appears to be the Mustang Nation's gradual move toward abandonment of '05-'10 cars, similar to the way '94-'98s were dropped like hot rocks when Power Improved Two-Valve 'Stangs hit the dealer lots in 1999.

Don't lose sleep over this. Three-Valve Mustangs are still hot, relevant, and definitely worth an investment, regardless of whether you're finally adding one to your stable, or upgrading your stocker. To emphasize this, we've recently stepped up our S197 tech coverage, with reports on suspension enhancements ("Xtreme Grip," Nov. '13), naturally aspirated power upgrades ("Back to Cool," Dec. '13) and this month's look at entry-level supercharging.

ProCharger's High Output Intercooled System (PN 1FP214-SCI; $5,896), with a P-1SC-1 supercharger, is the featured component in this tech effort. The bolt-on setup is all-inclusive, right down to the DiabloSport InTune flash device, loaded with a PCM calibration that's designed for the addition of boost (10 psi) to a Three-Valve Pony's engine program. Our buddy, Ricardo Topete, of GTR High Performance performed both the wrench-turning and dyno-testing tasks for this one. Check out the photos and captions to see how boost makes a significant difference on Eric Bell's stock '07 GT.

The engine in Eric Bell’s ’07 Mustang GT is perfectly bone stock, and makes 270 rwhp—the approximate power value that we’ve come to expect from unmodified 4.6-liter, Three-Valve Ponies.
A longtime rule of thumb for just about any bolt-on effort is to disconnect the negative (ground) battery cable at a project’s outset. The reason is to break the vehicle’s electrical circuit/stop the flow of current, and thus eliminate the chance of causing an inadvertent short circuit (which can damage the PCM, wiring, and such). Once the ground is disconnected, Ricardo also removes such items as the cooling fan, radiator, and the GT’s fascia in preparation for the supercharger’s installation.
If you’ve followed and recall any of our previous ProCharger tests on Two-Valve and Four-Valve modular engines, you’re aware that mod-motor superchargers typically are installed on the passenger side of the engine and turn in a reverse rotation (opposite the direction that the crankshaft turns). The Three-Valve system features a standard-rotation P-1SC-1 head unit that is driven independently by an eight-rib pulley that bolts directly onto the OEM damper.
Everything you need is included in one big box and clearly labeled for ease of installation. For those doing the project on their own, the High Output Intercooled System with P-1SC-1 (PN 1FP214-SCI; $5,896) bolts on in roughly 12 hours, provided you’ve got all of the necessary tools and provisions for raising a ’Stang high enough to work below the car (completing such tasks as installing the intercooler and its related ductwork).
Swapping injectors and replacing the stock fuel-pump are critical tasks in this upgrade. The stock 24-lb/hr squirters are replaced with 39-lb/hr (’03-’04 Cobra) units, and Ricardo switches the OEM pump with a higher-volume SVT Focus pump, all of which are included.
Swapping injectors and replacing the stock fuel-pump are critical tasks in this upgrade. The stock 24-lb/hr squirters are replaced with 39-lb/hr (’03-’04 Cobra) units, and Ricardo switches the OEM pump with a higher-volume SVT Focus pump, all of which are included.
Boost for the P-1SC-1 comes by way of a 3.7-inch pulley, which is good for about 10 psi.
Because of their colder-than-stock heat range, Autolite’s HT0 16mm high-thread spark plugs are used for supercharged Three-Valve Mustangs (note that ’05-to-early-’08s use the 16mm thread, and 12mm is required for late-’08-to-’09 GTs). Before installing the plugs, Ricardo uses a special tool to close the gap on each one to 0.035 inch.
The 10-psi, P-1SC HO system includes an InTune i-1000 flash tuner that’s preloaded with an application-specific PCM tune developed by ProCharger’s calibration engineers and Diablo-Sport’s MAFia. It is used to expand the stock mass-air sensor’s voltage range so it does not prematurely peg under WOT conditions. The final plug-and-play tasks for this project are installing the MAFia between the relocated mass-air sensor and stock wiring, confirming that it’s dialed to Setting 2, and then loading the calibration via the i-1000.
A small amount of bracket assembly is required before the blower can actually be set in place.