Jim Smart
April 16, 2010

Few things are more irritating than a sloppy, worn out steering column, which is important if you're really passionate about safety and driving comfort. We tend to ignore the steering column because it's a mystery to most of us, yet it is as simple as the steering shaft in a pedal car. From 1964-1967, Mustang steering columns consisted of a solid shaft to the steering gear, support collar and bearing, turn signal switch, steering wheel, and a series of rubber grommets at the bottom.

Mustangs didn't have the best steering columns. They were flimsy to begin with and didn't hold up well over time. It is challenging to get them feeling solid and comfortable. When everything is working properly, steering inputs should feel good without rumble, chatter, or clunk. It is also important to remember your Mustang's worn-out steering gear and linkage in all of this. A fresh steering column is meaningless without a mechanically sound steering gear, linkage, and front suspension.

Classic Mustang Steering Columns
From 1965-'67, Mustang steering columns were virtually the same (except non-tilt for '67). A solid steering shaft, which is also the steering box's worm gear, goes from the steering gear to the steering wheel. All the steering column does is support the shaft. The shaft is supported at the steering wheel with a ball bearing pressed into the collar where the turn signal switch is located. On '65-'66 Mustangs, a three-hole screw plate holds this bearing in place, topped by the turn signal switch. For 1967-'68, this plate is integral to the switch. The steering column tube is mounted to the dashboard via screw-in studs and locknuts. Two rubber grommets and a one-piece plate retain the steering column tube at the firewall. For 1967, it's a two-piece plate. A thick rubber grommet at the lower tip keeps moisture and dust out of your Mustang's steering gear.

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