Jim Smart
August 1, 2001

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How To Measure For A Custom Driveshaft
When we measure for a custom driveshaft, our measurements must be executed with close attention to detail. It's here that we suggest redundancy, because mistakes can be costly. Few things are more frustrating than having to have an expensive driveshaft made all over again. A shaft that's too long won't clear the differential yoke for installation. What's more, it can bottom out in the transmission, causing internal damage. A shaft that's too short can be hazardous and even pop out. Ideally, the front yoke will slide back and forth one half to three quarters of an inch when properly dimensioned. Remember the old carpenter's axiom: "Measure twice, cut once."

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Joint Effort
Universal joints are what enable a driveshaft to articulate smoothly with the transmission and rear axle in all kinds of conditions. To function properly, we have to have the right-size universal joint. Here are the most common types. Not shown are U-joints with two different-size widths and caps for special applications. IED can help you there too.

A: This is a Spicer 1350 with 1 3/16-inch caps.
B: The 1330 Spicer U-joint has 1 1/16- or 1 1/8-inch caps.
C: This is the 1330 Spicer with coated 1 1/16-inch caps for aluminum shafts.
D: The 1310 Spicer U-joint has 1 1/16-inch caps and is common to early Fords.


Spicer transmission yokes from IED come in three basic sizes: 1350, 1330, and 1310. If you're in doubt about the yoke you need, talk with the professionals at IED for fast answers and even faster service.

We measure universal joint size at the points shown in the accompanying illustration. Use these measurements when ordering parts from IED.

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