Jim Smart
September 1, 2008

Since its founding in 1981, Mustangs Plus has always been about having liberal amounts of fun with a classic Mustang. At a time when most of us were restoring to showroom stock and giving our Mustangs museum-class restorations, Mustangs Plus was inspiring enthusiasts to get out there and drive them. And so it has gone for 27 years.

The first step for the g-Link system installation is chassis prep, which isn't saying much. Chase bolt-hole threads to ensure smooth engagement. Here, we have removed the rebound bumper, which is one of the attachment points.

When Total Control Products was founded a decade ago to improve Mustang handling, it got off to a good start with outstanding suspension/handling products that have become more refined with time. Project Reclaim, a '65 Mustang fastback saved from the crusher more than a year ago, received TCP's front underpinnings in last month's issue, including a coilover suspension coupled with a power rack and pinion for superb handling, ride, and control. This month, The Restomod Shop at Mustangs Plus is installing TCP's new g-Link canted four-bar coilover rear suspension for '65-'70 Mustangs.

What You Get
Total Control Products was founded on the principle that all Mustangs were born to handle better. The company started in front with fully articulating control arms, spring perches, and strut rods with two options-Ford's coilover upper arm or TCP's fully articulating coilover approach.

Chris Alston's Chassisworks has kicked TCP's approach up a notch with an incredible array of suspension systems for vintage Mustangs. For the rear, the 5804-M10 (PN 13764) g-Link canted four-bar coilover suspension system for '65-'70 Mustangs doesn't come cheap, but it is ready for action. For $1,739.95 sans sway bar, you get a sophisticated suspension system that enables you to toss those worn-out leaf springs in the recycle bin.

Here's what you get:

  • Bolt-on subframe with four-link system
  • Varishock coilover adjustable shocks with 16-position valve adjustment
  • G-Bar Street Performance System that improves ride and handling
  • Air-bar if you decide on airbags
  • Premium urethane bushings
  • Options include:
  • 5812-M10 g-Bar sliding link antiroll bar
  • FAB9 axlehousing
  • Adjusting VariShocks
    When adjusting VariShocks for the street, you want more shock compression (bump) to take up road shock. At the baseline ride height, shock and spring should give (collapse) 40 percent from the installed height.

    If you intend to go road racing, you want a 50/50 mix of bump and rebound. It's not too stiff, but there's not too much give, either. Drag racers want it looser, with a 40 percent bump and a lot of rebound for good weight transfer.

    Adjusting VariShocks is a matter of knowing how to work the two QuickSet Two-Valves at the bottom of each shock. Turn the valve clockwise to increase stiffness and counterclockwise to decrease stiffness. The valve on the left controls bump (compression); the valve on the right controls rebound (extension). The first position is the softest setting.

    Street baseline is 60 percent bump, 40 percent rebound. Handling baseline is 50 percent bump, 50 percent rebound. Drag race baseline is 40 percent bump, 60 percent rebound.

    Affordable, Low-Buck Handling
    Because we're in challenging economic times, it may be difficult to afford a high-end TCP four-link rear suspension system. However, it's easier to afford better handling in a five-leaf Grab-A-Trak suspension system from Mustangs Plus.

    Grab-A-Trak is another name for handling with quality products you can bolt right onto a tired, old Mustang. If we were going this route with Project Reclaim, we'd fit a new Currie 9-inch housing along with 3.89:1 limited-slip cogs and the five-leaf, mid-eye Grab-A-Trak suspension from Mustangs Plus. Grab-A-Trak gas shocks provide a smooth ride, while KYB shocks deliver better handling with a firmer ride.