Steve Turner
Former Editor, 5.0 Mustang & Super Fords
August 23, 2011

Last we left Lethal Performance's '11 Mustang GT project car, it had laid down 700 hp at the tire and clicked off a 10.33 at 133.68 mph. At the time, hot shoe Jeremy Martorella of UPR Products fame felt that traction was holding the car back from making the most of its newfound power. It's not a huge surprise that hooking up 700 rwhp is a challenge, even on Mickey Thompson ET Streets. Of course, doing so with a stock suspension can make that task even more difficult. The fact is, these days adding massive horsepower is relatively easy. In ye olden days we could focus on power bolt-ons for a while, and then wait to get around to addressing our Mustangs' other areas. Today we can add instant horsepower and then we have to play catch-up.

"The Coyote has amazed me. It's one thing for a manufacturer to release a 400-plus-horsepower street car, but what you can achieve with the Coyote is unheard of," Jared Rosen of Lethal Performance enthused. "In years past you would have spent over $10,000 on a stroker, blower, and fuel system to achieve what we have with bolt-ons. We've seen over 500 hp with naturally aspirated bolt-ons, and over 700 with power adders. It is simply amazing!"

Sure, the chassis and suspension of modern Mustangs is far more in control than it was during the Fox era, but they are clearly biased toward handling. The stiffer chassis helps a lot, but when it comes to the dragstrip, you'll still be fighting wheelhop and traction. This is especially true if you're banging gears in a manual-trans car.

So to whittle down the e.t. of its project car, Lethal Performance turned to UPR Products for a rear-suspension revamp. Since test driver, Jeremy Martorella, works at UPR, he was able to work up just the right combination to dial in the hook.

"The factory three-link design works wellùthat is, until you hit it with 700 plus horsepower. The factory/rubber bushings have so much deflection, it's hard to make tuning changes as the suspension is inconsistent," Jeremy explains. "We saw as much as a tenth and a half change from run to run with the factory arms. The fact that the Coyote manual transmission has a 3.66 First gear ratio makes it even more of a challenge. By adding the UPR Pro Series kit, we have changed from the factory rubber to an adjustable Heim-joint-style suspension."

And dial it in he did. After adding this new suspension, the car's e.t. dropped to a 10.20 at 134.85 mph, and the 60-foots dropped from 1.45 to 1.41 seconds.

"Not only is the suspension able to handle 1,000-plus horsepower," Jeremy explains. "It's easy to tune and much more consistent. After the install, our 60 times improved over a tenth, and all runs were within a few hundredths. The addition of the Pro Series kit will now allow us to tune consistently and experiment with launch rpm and gear ratios."

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