Jeff Ford
August 1, 2004
Photos By: Jim Smart

When you first glance at Bob Harris' '67 hardtop you see he has the "everyman car" of 1967. But Bob's ride is far from everyman-in fact, due to its sweet look and nice stance it caught our eye at a recent show. Sure, the car posts many of the usual suspects: the paint is Candyapple Red, and the interior is standard black. However, the little hardtop's paint is so well applied and glossy we had a hard time hiding our reflection when shooting it. Bob has also kept it clean and has refrained from too many gee-gaws and frou-frou on the outside-note the absence of nameplates, pin stripes, flames, and other paraphernalia. We're not saying we don't like those things on a Ford, just that we do like the understated good looks Bob has achieved. Another place the hardtop shines is in Bob's choice of wheels. The Billet Specialties SLPs are set up to carry the P205/50R16 (front) and P245/50R16 (rear) BFGoodrich radials. These wheels are bolted to the stock drums out back and power Granada discs up front.

The interior holds its own surprises that help set this hardtop apart. the usual suspects are tossed in favor of some more unusual ones. The seat centers were custom stitched by North Hollywood auto upholstery in North Hollywood, California, and have black vinyl surrounding a cool (in a manner of speaking) black and gray cloth center. Underdash air conditioning offers a cheaper alternative to the factory in-dash a/c. The steering wheel is a Grant four-spoke with a black leather wrap. behind that is an Autogauge tach to keep track of the revs.

Speaking of revs, under the hood sits a restless 289 that has been warmed over with Edelbrock goodies (e.g., heads and intake). On top of these go-fast-goods is a Holley 650 double-pumper that spits raw fuel to the MSD-ignited plugs and sends the mix out via headers and dual exhaust. Behind the 289 is a C4 augmented by a shift kit. The stalwart tranny pushes power out to an 8-inch rear axle that packs a moderate 3.40 gear set.

Bob's car may host many of the usual suspects, but they're put together in an unusual way that makes you step back and take another look. So if you see a Candyapple Red hardtop tooling around Granada Hills, California, don't dismiss it as one of the usual suspects.