Steve Baur
Former Editor, Modified Mustangs & Fords
January 1, 2008
Photos By: Greg Jarem

Muscle Mustangs and Fast Fords magazine was born out of the fast-paced Mustang movement that called New Jersey-and Englishtown's Raceway Park, in particular-home. Guys like Jim LaRocca, Dwayne "Big Daddy" Gutridge, Nitrous Pete Misinsky, Craig Radovich, and Anthony Briante spearheaded the development of the EFI Mustang, eventually cracking the nines, then the eights. Meanwhile, about two hours south of E-town, in Vineland, New Jersey, a shop called Cervini's Auto Designs (800/488-6057; was developing those hot hoods covering all that horsepower.

From the Stormin' Normin Mach 1-style hood and cowl-induction bonnet came the first Stalker-type Mustang kit in 1993. While the majority of the body kit included Cervini's own '93 Cobra side skirts and rear bumper cover, the front fascia was an all-new design that set the Fox-body apart from the rest. Even today, Fox-body parts remain the second-highest moving items out of the Cervini's catalog.

Looking for a design he could call his own, Danny Cervini came up with one for the brand-new '94 Mustang-he called it the Stalker. This eventually led to a Stalker body kit for the New-Edge '99-up Mustangs, which is what we installed on our '01 Project Ice Box several years ago.

The speedster tonneau cover and styling bar are optional items that really complete the top-down look.

The '05-and-newer S197 Mustang body style posed a couple of questions for the Cervini's design team. On one hand, there was certainly a market for a nostalgic-styled body kit, but as proven with the Saleen and Roush Mustangs, people wanted a modern interpretation of the ponycar as well.

With that in mind, the team decided to create the nostalgic version first. We broke the story on Cervini's C-500 in our Dec. '05 issue. It has been a popular option for S197 owners, and you can find the C-500 body kit at road courses or on show grounds.

The company always planned to update the S197 Mustang with a Stalker body kit, and that process began in 2006, when the design team took cues from the C-500, earlier Stalker models, and vintage Mustangs to create the latest Stalker concept.

According to Cervini's Marketing Director, Jim Frie, the Stalker began as a few different renderings, which were then voted on by the Cervini's design team. Once a common opinion was narrowed down, the concept moved into the mock-up prototype stage. "We mock up proto-type parts to optimize things like installation, look, cost, fit and finish," Frie says. "This could continue several times until we get it just right."

Once the design was "right," an unveiling deadline was set. Cervini's favorite place to do this is at the Fords at Carlisle meet in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. From there, the company puts the parts on a one-month backorder to produce a supply of parts and make any last-minute changes that might need to be addressed.

Cervini's has always been known for its high-quality products, and the latest Stalker Mustang carries on this tradition. "It started with the first hood," Frie says. "Danny's (Cervini) very meticulous and has great attention to detail. Anything less than perfect is not good enough and unacceptable." This pays off in the end for the consumer, as the products require little prep work.

The Stalker body kit is made up of several different materials, with the new front grilles crafted from aluminum; the hood formed in fiberglass; and the side skirts, wing, and front and rear bumper covers constructed of urethane. The latter offers a little give, if you happen to nudge a curb with it.

With the C-500 body kit, Cervini's Auto Designs became its own car-modification facility, as you could drop off your S197 Mustang and pick it up later once the Cervini's team was through modifying it into a scooped and side-piped stallion. This tradition continues with the Stalker Mustang body kit, which consists of no less than 10 unique pieces, all of which are available separately.

If you're looking just for parts, PN 9047 nets you the entire 10-piece kit-the Stalker hood, front bumper, upper and lower billet grilles, rear bumper, trunk filler panel, exhaust inserts, side skirts, three-piece wing, and side scoops-all for just $2,999. Optional is the Mustang styling bar (PN 8033) for $499 and the Mustang speedster cover (PN 4361) at $499.

If you'd rather have Cervini's transform your vehicle, the company offers two levels of modifications. The Stalker Mustang includes the 10-piece body kit painted to match your ride, a set of lowering springs to drop it and make it handle, and a wheel and tire package to set things off. The cost of admission to this fun ride is an additional $9,995 over your Mustang payment.

Arrest-mE-Yellow paint combined with boatloads of horsepower can be a lot of fun, or a lot of trouble.

For those who want the show-and-go factor, Cervini's offers the Super Stalker package, which bolsters the Stalker body system with a Ford Racing Performance Parts/Whipple supercharger upgrade, as well as a Wilwood 14-inch front disc brake package. An optional rear-brake upgrade is available. The supercharger setup takes your Mustang's 300 factory horses and raises that number to 475 at the rear wheels. Torque bumps in at a hefty 450 lb-ft. Installed, the Super Stalker package runs $19,995 above the cost of your Pony.

Taking from Evander Holyfield's nickname, the Super Stalker is the "Real Deal" and offers everything the Mustang enthusiast could ever want. We're not sure you'll be hiding much in the shadows with all that Cervini's Stalker Mustang offers, but the weak and slow in the herd will be at your mercy.