Randy Bolig Editor
September 1, 2002

In 1965, the Ford Motor Company wanted to enter its Mustang into SCCA competition. There was a problem. You see, the Mustang was not considered a sports car by the sanctioning body.

Lee Iacocca had a dilemma. He enlisted the services of Carroll Shelby and his team at Shelby American to create a road-course killer from a relatively mundane Mustang. The ensuing months of intense labor produced a car even the SCCA could not ignore. Shelby and his crew of craftsman created the undisputed king of the ponycars. The GT version of the Mustang gave the buyer the best performance components available in the Mustang stable. This meant you got the heavy-duty suspension, quick-ratio steering, and disc brakes in the handling department. The eye-candy department gave you new-style GT emblems, stripes, a couple of grille-mounted fog lamps, and a slightly revised interior. This gave the Mustang a look to complement the performance of the 271hp, 289ci V-8 engine option available also with the GT package.

It was a popular choice. In 1965, 15,079 performance-seekers ordered the Mustang with the GT option. This particular thoroughbred is from the stables of Mark Stitzer, a purveyor of fine vintage steel from the quiet little town of Greenwich, Connecticut. This beautifully restored blue gem boasts all required equipment needed to satisfy any true motorhead, including a healthy 289 V-8 four-speed combination connected to the road course via Goodyear Eagle GTs. When Mark feels life is moving a little too fast, all he has to do is saddle up and ride off into the sunset.

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