Michael Johnson
Technical Editor
March 30, 2017
Photos By: Travis Welch

When it comes to going fast, there are also many ways to accomplish your speed goals. Some choose the naturally-aspirated approach, while most others choose the power adder route with their choice of nitrous, supercharger, or a turbocharger.

Some choose a combination of boost and nitrous, but for Port Royal, Virginia’s Andy Howard, one turbo is all he’s needed to pave the way to 8-second elapsed times. However, now he’s looking for 7s.

Andy’s owned over 20 Mustangs, but he bought this 2013 GT after hearing so many good things about the Coyote engine. “This is a Track Pack car, and I thought it would be a typical bolt-on car, and drive the heck out of it,” Andy says. The car’s first mods were long-tube headers, an axle-back exhaust, and lowering springs. “It wasn’t long after that I wanted more,” Andy adds.

He visited JPC Racing for some suspension additions, and a nitrous kit, which resulted in high-10s with the stock MT-82 transmission and stock clutch. “I had fun with the stick, and had fun with the nitrous,” he says. Andy enjoyed the car mostly on weekends, but then he decided he wanted to go fast so back to JPC he went for the car’s turbo kit and Powerglide transmission swap.

Here’s the stock cubic inch powerplant featuring Darton Sleeves, Oliver rods, Diamond pistons, and the stock heads and cams. Of course, almost 30 pounds of boost from a JPC single turbo kit, that’s going to make a huge dent in the pavement upon launch. To make sure Andy has just the right amount of power, the car is tuned by JPC’s Kevin MacDonald.

JPC added one of its single turbo systems, but with an upgraded Precision 8285 single turbo and ProCharger intercooler. To take the boost, the car received an RGR Engines-built short-block with Darton sleeves, Oliver I-beam connecting rods, and Diamond pistons. The compression was kept high at 11.5:1 before the stock heads and cams were reinstalled. Andy loved the stick, but in the hopes of going really fast, in went a Transmission Specialties-built Powerglide with a JPC spec’d converter. Finishing off the transmission swap is a TCI Outlaw shifter, a B&M transmission cooler, and a Driveshaft Shop aluminum driveshaft. Out back is the stock 8.8 that’s been fortified with Strange Engineering axles, a Wavetrac differential, and 3.73 gears.

With these performance changes, Andy’s ride was good for an 8.24 at 165 mph with a 1.20-short time. Those times are the result of the car wearing pretty much everything BMR Suspension sells. The car has a BMR front K-member, control arms, radiator support, front and rear springs, Viking rear shocks, and BMR rear upper and lower control arms and anti-roll bar. Andy’s ride wears Belak wheels with Mickey Thompson rubber, including 275/60 ET Street Radial Pros out back.

Up until recently with the addition of a DMC Racing 10-point cage, the car has lacked many safety features. However, for 2017 Andy is addressing those issues by adding the cage, racing seats, and a parachute to help scrub down speed in addition to the Aerospace Components brakes.

Running low-8s, Andy could smell 7s, so that is the goal for 2017, and beyond. For a run at the 7s, Andy is changing out the front struts, taking some weight out of the car, adding more boost, adding a Holley Sniper intake manifold, and DMC Racing is adding a 10-point cage, as well. “We’re gonna play,” Andy says.

You’ll be able to see Andy’s GT pacing its way into the 7s at the NMRA’s Motorsport Nationals at Maple Grove, and World Finals at Bowling Green, Kentucky. He also plans to hit up the Imports vs. Domestics at MIR since it’s in his neighborhood, and the Mod Nationals at SGMP.

If the car’s past performance is any indication, the GT’s road to the 7s will be just as smooth.

Andy would like to thank Howard Bros. Paving, JPC Racing, RGR Engines, BMR Suspension, Belak Industries, and his number one supporters, his wife Jessica and daughter.

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