Jerry Heasley
August 21, 2015

When Dale Wicks drives his dad’s Bright Lime Mustang convertible he gets more looks and thumbs-up from other drivers than anything he has ever driven, leading his dad Jim to describe his car as “the ultimate Pop.”

Jim is the founder and event coordinator of the Mid-America Ford & Shelby Nationals, held each June for the past 41 years in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and got this 1972 Mustang convertible on a trade-in for a 1966 Shelby G.T. 350H a couple years ago. It was hard to turn down because, as Jim told us, “I had only seen one Bright Lime convertible in my life so I knew this car had to be super rare.” In 1969, Ford introduced their “Grabber” colors, including Grabber Blue, Grabber Orange, and Grabber Green, adding Grabber Lime in 1971. At first, we thought this 1972 might be a Grabber color but not so, as Grabber colors ended in 1971. So, we wondered if this Bright Lime was the same shade as the Mustang’s 1971 Grabber Lime. “More yellow” in Grabber Lime, Jim explained, adding, “This Bright Lime in bright sun looks very yellow, a lot like the Curious Yellow Mopar color. But, in the shadows or at night, it looks very lime.”

According to an Elite Marti Report, this 1972 model was an Order Type of Company Lease Plan for Ford Motor Company in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The address is listed simply as Box 11600. Wicks guesses the 1972 was a Ford executive’s car, and we have to wonder if anybody remembers this showy Mustang from that area. Maybe Ford loaned this car to media for test drives and photos? Surely, there would be some pictures somewhere of this high profile looking automobile.

Those old pictures will not show sides stripes or a ram air hood, however, as seen here, since a past owner added the ram air, which was actually available on the 351-2V that is stock on this car. Likewise, a past owner also upgraded the wheels with a set of Magnum 500s. The tires are late model BFGoodrich radials.

Ford got caught trying to certify the ram air 351-4V with the proving ground tests done on the ram air 351-2V. Therefore, due to a lack of time and resources, ram air became an option only on the 351-2V. Enthusiasts added ram air later.
The stock hood was flat. The ram air hood is functional and available only with the two barrel 351. The underside of the ram air hood reveals supporting hardware to route the air into the carburetor.

Jim jokes that his son Dale owns the car, to which Dale said, “The 1972 is our car. We just both enjoy it.” However, on summer evenings Dale and his wife and two young daughters (six and 10) are most likely to be seen in this boulevard cruiser. “There’s a local place in Tulsa we like to go to, Freckle’s Frozen Custard. We all drive down there and get some frozen custard. Then, we generally take a cruise to the different neighborhoods,” Dale said. Dropping the top is as easy as pushing a button because the backlite is folding glass, and the transmission is automatic, just right for eating cold summer treats while cruising.

A past owner could not resist pulling the stock “wheel covers” for a set of the Magnums–kind of like some people just can’t resist popping those little bubbles in bubble wrap. Tires are late model radials; all the better for driving.
The Deluxe seats feature Comfortweave upholstery.

We spotted the Mustang at last year’s Mid-America Ford & Shelby meet in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and read the Elite Marti Report listing the options, which always have their quirks. We had to wonder why an AM radio and not FM, and also why wheel covers (hubcaps) were ordered and no fancy Magnums on such a showy car. Yet they specified a tilt steering wheel. And why did they order a Traction-Lok rear axle and not get a four barrel 351? Somewhere along the car’s 63,000 original miles, a past owner added the ram air system, stripes and a set of factory Magnums, like Ford should have done.

If anybody knows the Ford Motor Company history of this 1972 convertible, please drop us an email at jerryheasley@gmail.com or mustang.monthly@enthusiastnetwork.com, and we’ll forward the info to Jim and Dale.

Jim Wicks has discovered Bright Lime pulls more attention than a red Mustang parked alongside him at a show. Ford, according to the Marti Report, built 210 1972 Mustang convertibles in this Bright Lime color. Along with the black out ram air hood a previous owner added Mach 1 lower side stripes.