Amie Williams Associate Online Editor
July 16, 2015
Photos By: Grant Cox

Each passing year it seems that fewer and fewer kids are getting into the automotive hobby. Could the future generation of gearheads be dwindling? With smartphones constantly attached to little fingertips and instant gratification found with just a swipe through their newsfeeds, less time is likely spent in the garage building race cars with their dads. How refreshing it is to see that this scenario doesn’t hold true for Shane Mock and his 15-year-old son, Brendan.

Brendan Mock has raced Junior Dragster since he was 6 years old, so he grew up racing and working on cars. “He’s a two-time points champion in Jr. Dragster, and whatever our next project will be, he’ll probably move up into that,” Shane tells us.

The Mocks of Wichita, Kansas, bought this 1989 Ford Mustang back in September 2012 as a “very unfinished project” when Brendan was just 13 years old. The father-son team built and tuned the coupe in their garage and created this 1,500hp monster—and that could be speaking modestly. It hasn’t officially been strapped to the dyno, but it has conquered the eight-mile in 5.03 seconds and will likely take on the 1,320 in the 7.70-second range or better, according to Shane.

“I had a GT before this that was a low 10-second street car. I sold that and then we built this coupe. This car was built for local 275 racing and street driving,” Shane tells us. “I’ve raced heads up since the mid-1990s, and I’ve had Camaros back in the day.”

Thanks to the Mocks, this mean Fox-body coupe is powered by a bored and stroked Dart 417 block with a Lunati Pro Series crank and GRP connecting rods and has a 9.0:1 compression ratio. Shane and Brendan built the engine, but they had the machine work performed by Big Mike’s Speed & Machine shop, also in Wichita.

The two installed a custom Bullet roller camshaft with a custom Steve Morris grind along with TFS-R aluminum cylinder heads built by Total Engine Airflow, plus Jesel 1.7:1 rocker arms. A Holley HP EFI was provided by Derek at Modern Speed. An unported Edelbrock Super Victor intake and an Accufab 90mm throttle-body were also added to feed the beast.

Ignition components are made up of an MSD 7AL ignition box, coil, and distributor; Ford Motorsport wires; and NGK-9 plugs. Fuel delivery is handled by Moran 235-lb/hr injectors, a Weldon fuel pump, and an Aeromotive regulator.

To seriously amp up the power, Shane and Brendan installed a ProCharger F1X with ATF dual brackets that pumps out a healthy 29 psi of boost on command. Power is then routed through a Rossler Powerglide transmission freshened by Flip-O-Matic of Wichita. It also possesses a B&M shifter, a JW pressure plate, and a Neal Chance bolt-together converter with a 4,600 stall speed. For added airflow and rumble, exhaust flows through Kooks 2-inch headers and is routed through an H-pipe with Dynomax Bullet mufflers.

Suspension and chassis modifications include a UPR K-member and control arms, Strange front coilovers with AFCO springs, UPR upper and lower control arms out back, AFCO double adjustable rear shocks, and a UPR double sway bar. The 8.8 rearend is filled with 3.73:1 gears with Strange 35-spline axles and a spool.

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Gracing the exterior of the car are AlumaStar 2.0 wheels on the front and Champion beadlocks on the rear wrapped with Mickey Thompson 275 Pro rubber. Stopping power is provided by Wilwood brakes, with dual calipers clamping down the rear. The rollcage inside was built by Putnam Performance.

Even all of the bodywork has been handled by Shane and Brendan. They fitted a VFN 3-inch cowl hood, a Team Z rear wing, new headlights, turn signals, and all-new weatherstripping. Everything was sprayed Nason’s Cyber Grey by Rick Hangen using three basecoats and three clearcoats.

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Other modifications include custom door panels, a custom headliner, and a rear package tray by Jeff Weilert, a family friend with a 1990 notch that graced an earlier issue of MM&FF. Shane and Brendan both helped build Jeff’s Fox, and it was also tuned by Shane.

“We’re ready to do something else, and we’ll probably do another project,” says Shame. “We played with it, raced it, and it was meant to be a fun street car. I’m not sure what we will pick up next, but it will probably be completed by the first of the year.”

This one will be a project between Shane, his son, and Jeff Weilert. We can’t wait to see what’s next for this father-son team.

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