Amie Williams Associate Online Editor
September 15, 2014
Photos By: Jerry Heasley

Bruce Schreiner, CPA and Mustang collector from Hastings, Nebraska, caught wind of the imprisoned classic Boss and fought to get his hands on it. Completely unmolested, this Boss 429 is all original straight down to the Goodyear rubber.

All of the documentation, elite Marti Report, and Ford Motor Company stickers were included and still intact as it slept for four decades in an old, windowless garage collecting dirt and dust in every crease and crevice.

"I talked to every PR guy that I could to try and get my hands on it and it was a process, and luckily I talked them into selling it to me," Bruce told us. He finally became the official owner in November 2012.

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Due to being tucked away for most of its life, the Boss has accumulated just over 17,000 miles during its 44 years in existence. According to Bruce, the first owner racked 13,000 of those miles before blowing up the engine. Ford then replaced the original engine under warranty right before the Boss was cast into decades of dark slumber.

"I did not move toward making it run for quite some time after I got it," Bruce told us.

Bruce recently made the haul with the rare Boss 429 to Charlotte Motor Speedway for the Mustang 50th Birthday Celebration where it sat in the "Rare Finds Display" tent with many other classics, many of which were cleaned up and restored. While sitting next to other rare finds, Bruce's Boss 429 was the only one sitting with decades of dust covering its massive engine bay. "Leaving it dirty has given it more attention than cleaning it up and restoring it. Mine sat next to cars that have been completely cleaned up and people flocked around mine with its decades of dirt," Bruce told us. "It just seems to have a certain appeal."

Where many cars are nice to look at, the dust adds a touch that seems to spark interest of some untold story. While finds like this seem to be more and more common, the story of acquiring such a gem from rotting away in some barn or garage is always intriguing.

The Boss 429’s engine was replaced under warranty and has since racked up just 5,000 miles. Bruce decided to leave the engine bay in “as found” appearance.

When asked if Bruce takes the car out to more shows and events from time to time, he says, "I only drive it about 20-40 mph. I don't want to remove the original Goodyear tires."

According to Bruce, this Boss 429 is 1 of 272 total produced and 1 of 210 featuring white décor seats. However, this is the one and only Boss 429 produced with a rear deck spoiler and sport slats.

Some may consider Bruce lucky for stumbling across this '70 Boss 429 in its original condition and for him to be able to call it his very own. Lucky he may be, but this beautiful classic Boss is not the only dream car that he is able to call his own. Bruce has a garage on his property that houses quite a few classics and could make any serious Mustang enthusiast a little weak at the knees.

"My brothers and I started all of this," Bruce told us. "We each bought one after graduating high school."

Among Bruce's collection of classic Mustangs sits a few gems, such as a '65 289 hardtop, '66 Shelby GT 350, '68 Shelby GT 500KR, '70 Mach 1 powered by a 351 Cleveland, '71 Boss 351, and a '72 Mach 1 H.O. 351 (only 390 ever produced) and the one Bruce bought himself after graduating high school, Bruce's two brothers both own Mustangs that share Bruce's real estate—a '69 Mach 1 Cobra Jet and a '70 Boss 302, the two Mustangs they purchased for themselves after graduating high school that helped feed the Mustang mayhem.

Bruce's Boss has graced shows such as the aforementioned Mustang Birthday Celebration in Charlotte as well as the 39th Mid-America meet held in Tulsa. Bruce plans to keep the decades of dust covering the engine bay in a way to showcase its interesting history.