Marc Christ
Brand Manager, Modified Mustangs & Fords
March 4, 2014
Photos By: Evan J. Smith, Auctions America

Number 260

After having my world turned upside down by the Cobra, Auctions America Car Specialist Megan Boyd tossed me the keys to a ’65 Shelby GT-350, and said “Let’s go!” She jumped in the passenger seat, took a photo of me in the driver’s seat with my phone, and we were off. As we cruised over the same pavement that I just pounded with the Cobra, there was no need to remind myself that I was driving an original Shelby GT-350.

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Much less of a sports car, and very much a ponycar, Number 260 was still very much Shelby. It rumbled very much like the Cobra, but drove more like a Mustang. In Wimbledon White with blue LeMans stripes, it kept reminding me of its history and its stature. I could see the hoodscoop and hood pins as I looked ahead, and all was right with the world.

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With the windows down, I could hear the side pipes scream out a glorious tune. As I pressed it harder and harder, I began pushing the old Snake to the edge of traction. It certainly didn’t drive like the Shelby’s of today, especially with the bias-ply rubber; but what it lacked in poise, it more than made up for in character and styling. This was the real deal, and it wasn’t ashamed of it.

Like A Boss

Finally, I slid behind the wheel of an all-original ’70 Boss 302. The Bright Gold hue is original, and is showing its age. The interior remains untouched, as does the engine bay. As I settled into the high-back seat, I noticed the Hurst shifter, original AM radio, and period-correct Sun tach. I felt like a boss just sitting behind the wheel in the parking space.

The engine ran like new, and the odometer registers just over 36,000 miles. As I drove the 3,300-pound beast, I noticed immediately the strides in suspension and chassis technology over the ’65, though the bias-ply’s remained the limiting factor. The Boss is a legendary Mustang, and Auctions America thinks this one will bring between $40,000-$50,000—not bad for a piece of automotive history.

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Hopefully, Auctions American will give us the chance to do this again, but if not, no no will ever take away the experience. The auction will be held at the Broward County Convention Center March 14-16, 2014. For more information, go to www.auctionsamerica.com.