Michael Johnson
Associate Editor, 5.0 Mustangs & Super Fords
March 1, 2013

Following in the burnout marks of 5.0 Mustang pioneers like Brian Wolfe, Craig Radovich, Nitrous Pete Misinsky, and Stormin' Norman is a huge undertaking. However, just like those shootouts organized by Super Ford magazine back in the day, the current crop of Mustang pioneers are making their own mark in the hobby. These days guys such as Adam Browne of Revolution Automotive, Justin Burcham from JPC Racing, and Nelson Whitlock from Evolution Performance are paving the way for Coyote performance.

To harken back to the original 5.0 Shootout, Adam Browne organized the first 5.0 Shootout in 2011 at Maryland International Raceway. For the second-annual 5.0 Shootout, we once again returned to the valley of fast times that is Maryland International Raceway to see what a year's worth of development has done for Coyote-powered Mustangs.

Working with Adam on the Shootout, we surmised the event needed a class aimed at bringing together shops at the forefront of Coyote development. What with daily Facebook updates from every other shop bragging about dyno numbers or track times, the idea was to have these shops show up and do battle at the same track on the same day, head-to-head. The class was dubbed Shop Wars and it centered around power-adder '11-'13 Mustang GTs.

Unfortunately, the class didn't take off like we'd hoped. Judging by the braggadocios nature of many shops, we had dreams of a full 16-car field. However, maybe we were a bit optimistic. We thought what better place to lay down some times and beat fellow shops than at the shootout. Evidently, we were wrong.

No matter, though. The show must go on, and the shootout had plenty of interesting story lines, including a test and tune "class" aimed at settling a few pre-arranged grudge matches. The most popular class at the shootout was once again the Naturally Aspirated Street class, which is no surprise since that makes up the largest population of '11-'13 Mustang GTs.

If you missed it, check the captions for the details.

Horse Sense: Jay Willey, if you're not entered into a heads-up class at the third-annual Revolution Automotive 5.0 Shootout, just hand the keys over to us.


Power Added Unlimited

Not only does Revolution Automotive's Adam Browne organize the race, he also participates in it with his '11 GT. Adam competed in the Naturally Aspirated Unlimited class, which allows engine modifications and slicks. Adam is usually busy working on other people's Mustangs, but his GT boasts a Boss 302 intake; a 90mm throttle body; a JLT Performance cold-air intake; AHM Performance-ported heads with Boss valvetrain parts; JPC Racing cams; American Racing Headers long-tubes; an off-road X-shape crossover; a Flowmaster axle-back exhaust; a McLeod RST twin-disc clutch; a Dynotech driveshaft; 3.73 gears; and a Detroit True-Trac differential. For traction help, Adam uses UPR Products control arms with QA1 rear shocks and Cobra Jet springs. Adam's car makes 509 hp at 7,900 rpm, but at the shootout he was still having an isssue with the cams reverting back to 0 degrees between shifts. He says that drops 60-plus horsepower out of the equation, which kept him from getting past Justin Burcham in the final.

Our boy Leo Sturm had his '96 GT at the shootout to ultimately see how quick his car would go. With a built AHM Performance-built 5.0 modular under the hood and a Tremec T56 Magnum in the tunnel, the GT is usually good for deep into the 11s. Leo mostly uses the GT on the street and for autocross/HPDE exploits, but he also tries to keep up with/beat up on Coyote-powered Mustangs. At the shootout, running test and tune passes all day, Leo started out running 11.teens on street tires. After bolting on a big 'n' little package with slicks out back, Leo ran in the 10.90s, which lead us to shoot his car for a feature. You'll be able to read more about Leo's GT in an upcoming issue. We promise not to say anything about that redlight at the Modular Shootout way back in the day-maybe.

At last year's shootout, Marco Ponce Jr. was one of the few Boss 302s in attendance. This year, however, he had a few Boss 302s as fellow competitors. Marco also competes at NMRA events with his Boss, and by now he's learned what the car likes at the track. As such, Marco qualified fourth in Naturally Aspirated Street with an 11.55. Marco was able to get past Johnny Lighting in his new Boss, and then Bill Tumas in the CJ Pony Parts GT, but Calvin Atwell ended his weekend in the semis.

We don't think Johnny Lightning will be changing his name to Johnny Boss anytime soon, but he did have this '13 Boss 302 at the Shootout he had just received as a birthday present from his wife. We should all be so lucky. Speaking of lucky, Johnny was also busy driving a Cobra Jet in the Power Adder Unlimited class at the event, as well. However, his luck didn't transfer into a win in either class. In the Naturally Aspirated Street class, Johnny and his Boss were just getting acquainted, and Marco Ponce Jr. took out Johnny in Round 1.

Evolution Performance brought this Shelby GT500 to the shootout to help shake it down for the owner. With a Whipple 4.0-liter supercharger atop a built 5.4, and a C4 in the tunnel, Evolution's Nelson Whitlock found the car too tough to tame at MIR. The car would go straight up at the hit, not allowing for a clean run all day. Of course, with over 1,200 lb-ft of torque at the wheels, we would expect nothing less.

Telford, Pennsylvania's Michael Harris had a relatively easy day in the Power Adder Unlimited class, sponsored by Justin's Performance Center and CJ Pony Parts. With three cars in the class, the cars of Johnny Lightning and Justin Burcham broke during qualifying, which left Michael's '13 Cobra Jet as the lone participant. Johnny Lightning lined up his Cobra Jet for a photo-op final-round match-up, but transmission issues kept Johnny from putting up a real fight. Johnny had a low e.t., while Justin had the fastest mph in qualifying, but in a battle of attrition, Michael's Cobra Jet took the win.

Power-Adder Street

Our Shop Wars concept actually played out in the Power Adder Street class with JPC Racing customer Al Davis running against Evolution's Nelson Whitlock in the final. Al's '11 GT boasts a JPC Racing single-turbo kit running around 9 pounds of boost. Al's GT sports a stock short-block with JPC heads and cams, a BMR Suspension K-member and suspension, a stock automatic with a Circle D converter, and 3.73 gears. Al's GT utilizes Weld RTS wheels, while an Insane Racing Fabrication rollcage keeps him safe and legal. At the shootout, Al was running 10.teens all day, which was good enough for a runner-up finish. After the event, with a tad more boost, the car finally ran in the 9s, and still with the stock short-block. Well done, Al. In the Power Adder Street class (sponsored by CJ Pony Parts and Lethal Performance), we were interested to see how Justin Cyrnek's '13 GT would do. For Power Adder Street, the cars had to run DOT tires, weigh 3,650 pounds, and run a single power-adder. We knew Justin's GT had just won a

Our Shop Wars concept actually played out in the Power Adder Street class with JPC Racing customer Al Davis running against Evolution's Nelson Whitlock in the final. Al's '11 GT boasts a JPC Racing single-turbo kit running around 9 pounds of boost. Al's GT sports a stock short-block with JPC heads and cams, a BMR Suspension K-member and suspension, a stock automatic with a Circle D converter, and 3.73 gears. Al's GT utilizes Weld RTS wheels, while an Insane Racing Fabrication rollcage keeps him safe and legal. At the shootout, Al was running 10.teens all day, which was good enough for a runner-up finish. After the event, with a tad more boost, the car finally ran in the 9s, and still with the stock short-block. Well done, Al. In the Power Adder Street class (sponsored by CJ Pony Parts and Lethal Performance), we were interested to see how Justin Cyrnek's '13 GT would do. For Power Adder Street, the cars had to run DOT tires, weigh 3,650 pounds, and run a single power-adder. We knew Justin's GT had just won a

Naturally Aspirated Unlimited

In the CJ Pony Parts-sponsored Naturally Aspirated Unlimited class, Justin Burcham had his NMRA Coyote Stock car at MIR to do battle against Adam Browne's '11 GT. Justin removed some NMRA weight, which explained the quicker e.t.'s. If you don't know, this car has a Ford Racing Performance Parts sealed Coyote engine, so for it to be running 10.30s is just a pure engineering marvel. Unfortunately, Adam wasn't able to put up much of a fight due to the aforementioned issues.

Naturally Aspirated Street

We always kid with Pete Espeut about his '12 Boss 302 having low miles on it since it's usually driven a quarter-mile at a time. In all seriousness, we love seeing Pete hammer the gears in the Boss as should be done with these cars. Pete's times usually hover in the 11.60 to 11.70 range, and it was more of the same out of Pete at the shootout. He qualified with an 11.59 to land in the fifth spot, and he was able to get past Joe Letourneau in Round 1 and Joe Jonos in Round 2. With the odd number of entries, Pete had a bye run in to the final, but the race was over at the start with a heartbreaking redlight to hand Calvin Atwell III the win. Since Calvin had been running a tad quicker than Pete, he knew a stellar reaction time was needed and he pushed the tree a tad too hard. In the largest class, Naturally Aspirated Street, sponsored by JLT Performance, Calvin Atwell III rebounded for Revolution Automotive by taking the win. Calvin's GT enjoys the now-commonplace mods on his GT, including a JLT Performance col

We always kid with Pete Espeut about his '12 Boss 302 having low miles on it since it's usually driven a quarter-mile at a time. In all seriousness, we love seeing Pete hammer the gears in the Boss as should be done with these cars. Pete's times usually hover in the 11.60 to 11.70 range, and it was more of the same out of Pete at the shootout. He qualified with an 11.59 to land in the fifth spot, and he was able to get past Joe Letourneau in Round 1 and Joe Jonos in Round 2. With the odd number of entries, Pete had a bye run in to the final, but the race was over at the start with a heartbreaking redlight to hand Calvin Atwell III the win. Since Calvin had been running a tad quicker than Pete, he knew a stellar reaction time was needed and he pushed the tree a tad too hard. In the largest class, Naturally Aspirated Street, sponsored by JLT Performance, Calvin Atwell III rebounded for Revolution Automotive by taking the win. Calvin's GT enjoys the now-commonplace mods on his GT, including a JLT Performance col

Coyote Swap

With two customer cars in the Coyote Swap class, class sponsor Revolution Automotive had a good chance of one of their customers taking the win. NMRA-regular Shane Stymiest was looking to keep that from happening, but things didn't exactly go his way. Instead, Ronnie Reynolds, one of Rev Auto's customers, took the win. Ronnie's car is an '03 GT convertible with a Coyote swap, of course. With a custom tune from Revolution Automotive's Adam Browne, Ronnie's car makes well over 400 hp at the wheels, and his 11.18 qualifying effort showed it. With three cars in the class, unfortunately, Ronnie had to run fellow Rev Auto racer TJ Lapinski in his '04 GT coupe, with Ronnie taking the win. He then ran unopposed in the final round for the win. Ronnie's 'vert features a JLT Performance cold-air intake, BBK Performance swap headers, McLeod RST clutch, 26-spline 3650 transmission, Maximum Motorsports rollcage, UPR Products K-member, and Lethal Performance return-style fuel system.

Well, Shane Stymiest showed up at MIR for the 5.0 Shootout with a stick in the car. Up until the shootout, Shane had a C4 in his NMRA Coyote Stock car, but we think he quickly realized the car needed a stick in order to keep up. At MIR, Shane posted a stout 10.64 at 125 mph to top the qualifying sheet, and also show he had the car figured out, at least for a little while. Unfortunately, he damaged the transmission after just a couple passes, leaving him a spectator as Ronnie Reynolds took the win. With the NMRA finals just a week and a half after the shootout, we suggested Shane bring two transmissions to that race. 5.0