Michael Johnson
Associate Editor, 5.0 Mustangs & Super Fords
May 1, 2013
Photos By: Steve Turner

For our yearly American Muscle King of the Street competition, we usually choose 10 to 12 cars. Our hope is—and it has been true to form in the past—that if a couple cars fall out (and they will), we’ll still have at least 10 cars competing. In 2012, the pre-competition attrition was at an all-time high. We picked our usual 12 cars and waited to hear the fallout. Of course, we heard from a couple leading up to the competition that they wouldn’t be able to make it. But when we arrived at Beech Bend Raceway’s amusement park area for the start of the competition, we were down a few more cars for a dismal six contestants. To say we were disappointed would be a huge understatement.

A ray of sunshine came in the form of Evolution Performance’s Fred Cook offering to call one of the company’s customers, who happened to be at Beech Bend Raceway to compete at the NMRA event. Domenic Didonato had his ’12 Shelby GT500 at Beech Bend, and after going over the car’s specifics with Fred, we decided to invite Domenic over to the KOTS game to pinch hit—and we’re glad we did. That brought the total number to a lucky seven. Not quite the 10 we like to have, but what we lacked in quantity we more than made up for with quality.

The King of the Street competition is designed to find the Mustang that best balances all-out horsepower and silky smooth driveability. We look for Mustangs that make a lot of power, but they must also display the ability to drive comfortably in traffic. Therefore, we look for overdrive transmissions, A/C, heat, cruise control, and the like. We have allowed non-overdrive transmissions in the competition, but everyone knows they are not as driveable, so we automatically deduct points for non-overdrive transmissions.

“To be clear about our standards for the King of the Street, we are looking for an ideal Mustang: one that looks great but performs at an elite level. Just bolting parts to a stock Mustang is attainable for anyone, but taking it to the next level is the pinnacle we seek,” Editor Steve Turner explained. “Typically the areas that are most neglected by competitors are the extra steps of appearance mods, the creature comforts, and the audio systems. I have always believed that it’s easy to make a car faster by stripping it down, but it’s far more challenging to retain these aspects in a performance car.”

One thing you’ll see with this year’s KOTS is that the finishing order basically mimicked the horsepower numbers made by competitors. That’s unfortunate as it implies horsepower is most important—in reality, it’s not. However, this year’s competition was a bit of an anomaly. We’ve always explained to people who are fixated on horsepower numbers that King of the Street is more than a power competition, but unfortunately that’s how it went this year. We’d like to think the other categories support a broad spectrum of deciding factors. It’s not every year that the highest horsepower car wins, but if a competitor scores well in the Horsepower and Ride & Drive categories, he is well on the way to excelling.

In order to verify the power each King of the Street car produced, we trekked over to Holley Performance Products, also in Bowling Green, to use its in-house Dynojet. Ensuring a level playing field, every car was given two pulls on the same dyno, on the same day, and received a 5-minute break between pulls for cooling and minor tweaks. What each car makes back home might get you into King of the Street, but it doesn’t help your ride wear the crown. The best number on Holley’s ’Jet is the one that counts.

If there’s any aspect of the King of the Street we strive for it’s diversity. Diversity of body styles, and diversity of power adders and transmission combinations. We don’t want a bunch of similar combinations and body styles in the competition, but this time around we were left with several ’11-’13 Mustangs in the competition. We didn’t have a Fox Mustang apply. We had one pushrod combination, and it was also a SN-95 car so were excited for that car to see how it would do. Unfortunately, that car ran into problems right before the competition and had to drop out.

Of the seven competing cars, we had two outside the ’11-’13 Mustang category, and one was Jammye McQuade’s ’07 GT500, which we invited back for a little redemption. That left Steve Shrader’s ’99 GT as the only non-S197 Mustang, and the oldest ride in the competition. However, as you’ll soon read, Steve’s New Edge held its own, even with a Two-Valve underhood. It was truly the “little engine that could” of the competition.

In the end, though, there was one car everyone else was trying to beat, and that was Jon Lund’s ’11 Mustang GT. Yep, you can add King of the Street to the car’s list of accomplishments. Congrats, Jon!


Horse Sense:
While reading this you are probably thinking your ride could win our little competition. Well, it’s time to put your ’Stang where your thoughts are. It’s never too early to submit your ride for KOTS consideration. Just mail or email a few shots of the car, a description of its mods, and a list of its performance credentials to KOTS, 9036 Brittany Way, Tampa, FL 33619, or 5.0mailbag@sorc.com. Get it to us before Labor Day. If we like what we see, you’ll find out on September 3—in plenty of time to make travel plans for the NMRA Ford World Finals in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in early October.

Vote for Pedro
Here’s a look at the Facebook poll as voted by readers and event attendees alike. We found this a more accurate representation of the true results instead of people stuffing a makeshift ballot box at the event. The Popular Vote is worth 10 percent of the final score for the King of the Street. The Horsepower, and Ride & Drive categories are each worth 25 percent, while the Engineering and Fit & Finish categories are worth 15 percent. Like the Popular Vote, the Drag Race category is worth 10 percent. If you add all the categories together, you see we score on a 100-percent grade scale.


Jon Lund’s 2011 Ford Mustang GT

Horsepower: 10 (1,034.38)
Ride & Drive: 8
Engineering: 8
Fit & Finish: 6
Drag Race: 9 (9.58)
Popular Vote: 10
Final Score: 85

We’re familiar with Jon Lund and his ’11 Mustang GT, and you should be as well. We featured it in the Nov. ’12 issue (“Alpha Mile,” p. 42). Editor Turner thought highly enough of it to choose it as the cover car for that issue, as well. If a car makes the cover, it deserves a T-shirt saying, “I’m kind of a big deal,” and Jon’s GT is definitely a big deal.

We don’t use the term ground-breaking lightly, but Jon’s GT has earned it. I mean, c’mon, in King of the Street trim, the car went 206 mph in the standing mile. That’s from 0 to 206 mph in a mile! Yet being an automatic, you can throw the keys to anyone and they can drive it to the store like a minivan.

Hopefully said person has enough sense to not get into boost right off the bat because this thing is stupid fast. OK, no King of the Street car should ever be handed over to a novice driver, but knowing your mom could jump behind the wheel and not need a tutorial before turning the key is what we’re after, and Jon’s GT fits the bill perfectly. The only advice your mom would need is, “Don’t get too heavy on that gas pedal.” Other than that, she’s golden.

Getting heavy on the gas pedal of a minivan doesn’t really provide much drama, but with Jon’s GT, the loud pedal is connected to 1,034.38 at the asphalt. Yes, that’s four digits. It’s not the most horsepower ever made at KOTS (Tony Alm’s GT500 made 1,139), but the next closest number in this year’s competition was that of Jammye McQuade’s ’07 GT500 at 853 hp. That’s almost a 200hp difference, and since Jon’s GT made the most power, it was awarded a score of 10 in the Horsepower segment.

Of course, the Ride & Drive scores are a closely held secret until this issue arrives, but as we hinted earlier, Jon’s GT drove really well. You truly could throw the keys to anyone and they’d be able to drive the car anywhere. In my notes, I wrote that Jon’s car was “really fast” with “really impressive power delivery.” An L&M Engines-built Coyote with twin-turbochargers is an unbelievable combination. You get the rpm combined with over 30 pounds of boost. The fact that Jon’s car is as docile as it is on the street, and yet so powerful on the dyno and at the track, means it’s the definition of a Jekyll and Hyde car for sure.

With a stock 6R80 automatic transmission outfitted with a Circle D converter, the car is smooth as stock driving around town, but at KOTS the car ran a 9.58 at 151 mph, which was just a tick off this year’s best time—much to the chagrin of the car’s caretaker Ken Bjonnes of Lund Racing, Jon’s righthand man. Since Ken lives in South Florida and works closely with Power by the Hour, the shop that built Jon’s GT, calling Ken the car’s caretaker is an accurate statement. Ken drove the car at Beech Bend Raceway for the Drag portion of the competition, and he wanted the quickest time badly. Since he didn’t get it, Ken isn’t going to hear the end of it anytime soon. Officially, Ken’s 9.58 was good enough for a second place in the Drag portion of the competition and a score of 9.

For the Engineering and Fit & Finish categories, which were both judged by Editor Turner, our fearless leader had these words to say about Jon’s car. “Despite its status as a new car, it packed in quite a bit of well-hidden engineering, from a built engine to a speed-sensitive boost controller. It also served as the testbed for the first version of a well-designed twin-turbo system. As evidenced by its dyno and track performance, that engineering was quite effective.” Editor Turner scored Jon’s car with an 8 in the Engineering category, but he wasn’t so friendly when it came to the Fit & Finish category.

Historically, Editor Turner is a tough judge when it comes to his categories. As such, it didn’t surprise us when we saw a 6 in the Fit & Finish category for Jon’s GT. “While Jon’s car was clean and purposeful, it appears relatively stock inside and out, so it graded just slightly above average from an F&F standpoint, thanks largely to the elegance of the turbo kit,” he added.

For the last category, the Popular Vote, it seems Jon’s GT struck a chord, and no kidding—look at it. The car has impact far beyond the others participating this year. Sure, the exterior doesn’t knock you down, but under the hood, that’s when your breath gets taken away. The Lund Racing twin-turbo kit is omnipresent, enough to inhale lesser cars and spit them out the twin Magnaflow tailpipes—and win the 2012 King of the Street.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain
Block
Stock

Crankshaft
Forged steel

Rods
Billet

Pistons
L&M Engines, coated

Camshafts
L&M Engines/Comp Cams custom

Cylinder heads
Ford Racing Boss 302

Intake manifold
Boss 302

Power Adder
Twinturbo.com twin-turbo kit w/ two 60mm turbos, TIAL MVS wastegates, TIAL 50mm blow-off valve, and air-to-water intercooler

Fuel system
Weldon 2345 pump w/ 200-lb/hr injectors, a Weldon regulator, and Aeromotive fuel rails

Exhaust
Twinturbo.com manifolds w/ Lethal Performance X-shape crossover and Magnaflow mufflers

Transmission
Stock 6R80E six-speed automatic w/ Circle D 2,200-stall converter and Dynatech driveshaft

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ stock 3.15 gears

Electronics
Engine management
Stock Copperhead w/ Lund Racing tune

Ignition
Stock

Gauges
Stock


Jammye McQuade’s 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

Horsepower: 9 (853.12)
Ride & Drive: 8
Engineering: 6
Fit & Finish: 6
Drag Race: 7 (10.43)
Popular Vote: 8
Final Score: 75.5

In a King of the Street first, we invited Jammye McQuade back for a little redemption after he laid an egg at last year’s competition. If you remember, in the days leading up to last year’s King of the Street, he had his engine compartment detailed and cleaning solution made its way into the coil-on plug galleys. The solution wreaked havoc on the car’s ignition system, causing the car to be way off its usually game.

During last year’s Ride & Drive portion, Jammye didn’t think I was putting the throttle on the floor. Anyone that knows me knows I like to put a car through its paces—not to the extent that the owner does, but I put it on the floor. Since Jammye thought I didn’t floor the car on the Ride & Drive, he didn’t think anything of it again until the next morning at Holley Performance Products for the dyno portion of the event. When his car came up short on horsepower, he knew something was amiss. His GT500 only produced 759 rwhp on Holley’s Dynojet last year, and after going through the drag portion, Jammye discovered the cleaning solution issue. Unfortunately, by then it was too late.

We felt for Jammye, so we allowed him an attempt to redeem his ride and himself—and he did. He returned this year with new wheels from AmericanMuscle wrapped in Nitto rubber for a more street-friendly disposition. Out back, Jammye outfitted the car with drag radials to hopefully maintain traction. From the Ride & Drive my reaction was: “Traction...not really.” I wondered if Jammye would have better luck with traction at Beech Bend Raceway, but he was still able to run a 10.43 at 123 mph. We’re pretty sure the 1.756 short time in this trim is a couple tenths off his usual 60-foot time using his drag setup, but the 10.43 was still better than last year’s 11.03 on about seven cylinders.

Between the improved quarter-mile performance, increased horsepower, and a better Popular Vote score, Jammye greatly improved his final score over last year’s effort. By making the second highest horsepower, he scored a 9 in that category, and then another 8 in the Ride & Drive. His son Jesse rode with us on last Year’s Ride & Drive and promptly fell asleep in the back seat. Evidently my driving bores him, as he wasn’t interested in riding along this year. Besides Jesse giving us the cold shoulder, the car’s only shortcoming on the Ride & Drive was a slight vibration, most likely exacerbated by solid engine mounts and a Heim-jointed, drag-oriented suspension.

In the Engineering and Fit & Finish categories, Editor Turner applauded Jammye’s move to AmericanMuscle wheels, but the car’s largely stock exterior didn’t help. “It also bears the battle scars of being driven on a regular basis, which is a double-edged sword,” added Editor Turner. He also thought Jammye’s ride was a bit industrial on the inside due to its sheetmetal mount for the air/fuel monitor and a litany of switches on the console.

Since Editor Turner is a GT500 owner, he tends to judge fellow GT500s “a bit more harshly,” he says. He holds them to a higher standard, if you will. His GT500 lives a pampered life covered up in the garage, only driven on nice days. Thankfully, Jammye drove his GT500 to the event from his Winchester, Kentucky, hometown, as well as all over Bowling Green during the event weekend.

Turner liked the big Kenne Bell 3.6-liter supercharger under the hood, but otherwise Editor Turner only found the expected Shelby GT500 mods. Therefore, he graded Jammye’s GT500 “just slightly above average in both categories because it didn’t go beyond what you expect from a nice GT500.” He scored Jammye’s GT500 with 6s in both Engineering and Fit & Finish. With his 10.43, Jammye scored a 7 in the Drag category, and his GT500 seemed to strike a chord with voters, scoring an 8 in the Popular Vote category.

We’re glad we gave Jammye a second chance, and he certainly made the most of his opportunity. Well done, Jammye.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain

Block
2011 Shelby GT500

Crankshaft
Kellogg

Rods
Manley billet

Pistons
Manley billet w/ Total Seal rings

Camshafts
Lunati w/ secret specs

Cylinder heads
Ported factory castings w/ Manley valvesprings, factory lash adjusters, and factory followers

Intake manifold
Kenne Bell Mammoth

Power Adder
Kenne Bell 3.6-liter supercharger w/ AFCO heat exchanger, and 26 pounds of boost

Fuel system
Stock fuel pump and lines w/ 80-lb/hr injectors

Exhaust
JBA

Transmission
Factory TR6060 w/ McLeod Industries RXT clutch, MGW shifter, and DriveShaft Shop driveshaft

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ stock 3.73 gears

Electronics

Engine management
Stock Copperhead w/SCT tune

Ignition
Factory, NGK TR6 plugs

Gauges
Stock w/ Innovate Motorsports wideband


Justin Cyrnek’s 2013 Ford Mustang GT

Horsepower: 8 (845.43)
Ride & Drive: 7
Engineering: 7
Fit & Finish: 8
Drag Race: 5 (12.54)
Popular Vote: 6
Final Score: 71

Coming into King of the Street, Justin Cyrnek and his Evolution Performance-built ’13 GT figured to be one of the cars to beat. Evolution has had a strong showing in the King of the Street, and Justin’s ’13 GT looked to continue that theme. It did, however, they likely hoped for a better weekend at the event. In the weeks prior to the King of the Street, the car competed in a Camaro-versus-Mustang event, winning it against a full-on race car with a 9.40 performance in the final. It also ran well at Adam Browne’s Revolution Automotive 5.0 shootout.

After enjoying that success at the track, the guys had to configure the GT back to King of the Street standards by swapping out the Weld big ’n’ littles with Mickey Thompson E/T Drag slicks to the pictured Savini 20-inch wheels with Nitto treads. The race seats also had to be replaced with Corbeau CR1 black suede seats in place of the stockers.

Once the car was streetified, the Evolution crew brought it from its Aston, Pennsylvania, headquarters to Beech Bend Raceway for the King of the Street. Right off the bat, the Gotta Have It Green smacks you in the face, but this is like getting smacked in the face by Marisa Miller. GHIG follows in the steps of other recent high-impact colors, and it makes the perfect canvas for a King of the Street car.

The color wins points from the get-go. Editor Turner showed he’s a fan of Justin’s GT. Steve thinks the nicer and newer the car is, the more difficult it is to stand out from the crowd of new cars. “Justin’s GHIG GT is about as new and striking as it gets. That sets the bar pretty high, but Justin’s car featured a number of cool exterior touches, from color-matched parts, black accents, and an unusual set of wheels. It was the standout car in F&F, but it still didn’t push the envelope as much as some past KOTS entries as it was pretty factory inside,” Turner said. Even so, Justin’s GT scored an 8 in the Fit & Finish category.

From an engineering standpoint, he was a big fan of the car’s clean return-style fuel-system conversion and the custom nitrous system spraying right into the blower’s EGR port. “These little touches notched it up a bit in the engineering category,” Turner added. As such, he scored Justin’s GT with a 7 in Engineering.

For the Horsepower category, Justin’s GT was the second car on Holley’s in-house Dynojet after Jammye McQuade’s 853-rwhp effort. Since you already know Jon Lund’s twin-turbo monster made 1,034 hp and Jammye’s made 853, Justin fell in behind with an 845.43 effort. Justin’s GT features an L&M Race Engines-built Coyote with a Whipple 2.9-liter supercharger and a squirt of the good stuff to arrive at that number. Therefore, he scored an 8 in the heavily weighted Horsepower category.

Speaking of heavily weighted categories, the Ride & Drive is weighted the same as the Horsepower category. Thanks to the car’s factory seatbelts teamed with the aforementioned Corbeau seats, the Ride & Drive got off to a pleasant start. The car rode and handled great, but with Ford Racing and Steeda Autosports suspension pieces, that was to be expected. Something that wasn’t expected was a transmission hunting for the right gear in town. Justin’s car features a 6R80 automatic, and after we drove the car, its tuner Jon Lund explained that tuning the new automatic and positive displacement superchargers can present some struggles. The transmission seemed to struggle with up and downshifts while out on the Ride & Drive. It was a bit unnerving, but there was also a bit of gear noise, as well. We didn’t believe Justin’s GT drove as well as others, so we scored it a 7 in the Ride & Drive.

The Drag Race portion was when Justin’s KOTS campaign fell apart. On the first of two allowable dragstrip passes as part of the Drag Race portion of the competition, the blower belt came off, leaving Evolution’s Nelson Whitlock to coast through with a 12.54. The guys tried to put a new belt on the car in time for the second pass, but it was discovered the car had broken a tensioner, which ended any chance of making a better time. Therefore, Justin’s GT scored a 5 in Drag Race category. Likewise, Justin’s GT ran mid-pack in the Popular Vote category. Our only explanation for that is, perhaps beyond the paint, it lacked the wow factor of some of the other competitors cars.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain

Block
Stock

Crankshaft
Forged steel

Rods
Forged

Pistons
L&M Race Engines

Camshafts
Stock

Cylinder heads
Stock

Intake manifold
Whipple w/ Ford Racing Cobra Jet throttle body, and JLT Performance Super Big Air intake

Power Adder
Whipple 2.9-liter twin-screw supercharger w/ a dry nitrous kit, 20 pounds of boost, 10-rib accessory drive, and an AFCO dual-pass heat exchanger

Fuel System
E85-compatible w/ Fore Innovations billet hat with dual 405 pumps, F4i regulator, and 205-lb/hr injectors

Exhaust
American Racing Headers 17⁄8-in long-tubes w/ off-road X-shape crossover pipe, and a Borla S-Type Cat-Back exhaust

Transmission
Circle D Specialties-built 6R80 automatic w/ Circle D Pro Series billet torque converter, and SFI-approved flexplate

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ Ford Racing Torsen differential and 3.55 gears

Electronics

Engine management
Stock Copperhead w/ Lund Racing tune

Ignition
Factory

Gauges
Stock w/ Auto Meter digital boost and fuel-pressure gauges in a Speed of Sound dual-gauge pod


Steve Shrader’s 1999 Ford Mustang GT

Horsepower: 7 (834.03)
Ride & Drive: 7
Engineering: 8
Fit & Finish: 6
Drag Race: 8 (9.86)
Popular Vote: 7
Final Score: 71

We thought the days of Two-Valve Mustangs competing in the King of the Street were long gone, much less one doing well. However, when we received Steve Shrader’s KOTS application, we knew he would carry high the Two-Valve banner.

The KOTS had become a Four-Valve competition long ago, but with promises of mid-800hp numbers, high 9-second times, and a street persona to match any other competitor, we had to invite Steve to the King of the Street.

If you’re familiar with the Yellow Mustang Registry, this is the car that started it all back in 2002. Steve sold the Registry in 2006 to concentrate on Shrader Performance, the performance wing of the operation. Steve’s GT is the result of his Gastonia, North Carolina, performance shop, with a lot of help from Jon Wilburn. Shrader Performance specializes in modular Mustang performance and engine builds. The recent purchaser of an ’01 Bullitt, I was particularly interested in getting a close-up look at Steve’s GT, and it didn’t disappoint.

First off, Steve’s GT stuck out like a 7-year-old at a Buckcherry concert since it was yellow and a New Edge car. In a sea of S197 Mustangs, a New Edge might as well be a totally different model, but rest assured, Steve’s GT is all Mustang.

Steve built a stock-bore-and-stroke Two-Valve with Fox Lake-ported Performance Improved heads, and cams with specs more secret than the Colonel’s secret recipe. On top is an Edelbrock Victor Jr. intake with an Accufab 75mm throttle body and a Pro-M meter. That alone won’t get you into the King of the Street, but Steve didn’t stop there, obviously. Using what he’s learned, he hung a Vortech S-Trim supercharger from the front of the Two-Valve with the extra sauciness of a Zex nitrous kit. Throw in a fuel system made for E85 and you have the Two-Valve that could.

Of course, on the Ride & Drive, I do my best to put all the KOTS cars through their paces. When it came time to drive Steve’s GT, I hit it once without spraying the nitrous, which Steve has connected to a button. Since his GT weighs in at 3,100 pounds, the 700-some-odd rwhp was plenty to impress your author. However, he urged me to introduce the nitrous into the equation, so I obliged. In my notes are the words, “Insane power delivery…it’s on like Donkey Kong when you mash the throttle, and you can tell a marked difference when you hit the nitrous.” To say Steve’s car gets up and moves is an understatement. Driving it made me want to throw rocks at my Bullitt when I returned home. All of this added up to 834.03 rwhp at the competition, which was good enough for a 7 in the Horsepower category.

For the Ride and Drive category, the New Edge chassis isn’t as good as the S197 chassis, which counted against Steve’s GT. Plus, the car was missing a couple interior amenities, and those concessions knocked the Ride & Drive score down to a 7.

For the Engineering and Fit & Finish scores, Editor Turner was impressed with the mechanical aspect of Steve’s GT, but besides that, the car didn’t quite hit all of his hot buttons. “Superficially, Steve’s ride is clean and old-school, with the Weld Drag Lite look that launched millions of Mustang dreams. However, it doesn’t venture too far outside the norm from there,” he said. For the Engineering category, thanks to the healthily engineered Vortech-boosted, Zex-sprayed, E85-burning Two-Valve that hangs with boosted Coyotes and Shelbys, Steve’s GT deserved every bit of its score of 8.

In Fit & Finish, Editor Turner says Steve’s GT picked up many of its F&F points under the hood, where the little Two-Valve is “cleanly augmented by a lot of support hardware without coming off like a bird’s nest.” However, thanks to Turner’s aforementioned gripes he scored Steve’s GT with a 6 in the Fit & Finish category.

Steve rebounded with a ripping 9.86 at 147 mph in the Drag Race category. Only Coffeeman’s ProCharged GT and Jon Lund’s twin-turbo GT ran quicker times. Therefore, Steve scored an 8 in the Drag Race category. In the Popular Vote, Steve had quite the following, scoring a 7 in that category.

All in all, we were impressed with Steve’s GT and have talked to him extensively about how best to modify our Bullitt, but unfortunately, he couldn’t quite put together the score to win the crown.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain

Block
Teksid aluminum

Crankshaft
Cobra eight-bolt

Rods
Forged

Pistons
D.S.S. Racing Engines GSX w/ Total Seal rings

Camshafts
Secret w/ Super Secret specs

Cylinder heads
Stock PI castings, Fox Lake-ported

Intake manifold
Edelbrock Victor Jr. w/ Accufab 75mm throttle body, and a Pro-M mass air meter

Power Adder
Vortech S-Trim supercharger w/ 17 pounds of boost, a Treadstone air-to-air intercooler, and a Zex nitrous system

Fuel system
E85-compatible w/ Dual Aeromotive A1000 pumps, Fore Innovations fuel rails, 80-lb/hr injectors, and an Aeromotive regulator

Exhaust
American Racing Headers long-tubes w/ X-shape crossover pipe, and Flowmaster mufflers

Transmission
TR3650 w/ SPEC clutch, and Steeda Autosports Tri-Ax shifter

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ Ford Racing differential, Moser axles, and 3.73 gears

Electronics

Engine management
Stock

Ignition
Stock w/ GMS Pro Series coils

Gauges
Stock


Joe “Coffeeman” DeCaria’s 2011 Ford Mustang GT

Horsepower: 6 (833.91)
Ride & Drive: 8
Engineering: 7
Fit & Finish: 5
Drag Race: 10 (9.56)
Popular Vote: 5
Final Score: 68

Like Jon Lund’s car, Joe “Coffeeman” DeCaria’s ’11 GT is pretty familiar. Since Joe lives in South Florida, we usually see it at all the Florida drag events, and Coffeeman is always fun to hang out with.

When we initially received Coffeeman’s application, we thought it was the perfect KOTS car. We knew the car ran deep into the 9s and was more than street worthy. When we first saw GT at the competition, however, we were blown away by its condition. When we see it at the track, it’s in race trim, but at the King of the Street, we didn’t think it was the same car. At the track, the car is usually dirty and looks hard, but for King of the Street, it looked amazing. However, it definitely was the same car.

For its King of the Street close-up, it looks like Coffeeman’s GT received a full detail, new pinstripes and graphics, and most importantly, RTR wheels. The car looked the best we had ever seen it…by far. Both Editor Turner and I were in agreement: Coffeeman’s GT was going to do well. But of course, at that time, we didn’t know how it would do in every category.

After Editor Turner photographed the car, it was time for the Ride & Drive. Here’s where the wheels momentarily fell off. Unfortunately, Coffeeman’s GT stalled a couple times on the Ride & Drive, which might as well be a death sentence when it comes to this category. The explanation given for the stalls is that the car was tuned in the Florida heat, and the E85 fuel system management is a little temperamental in cooler temps. That is probably an accurate assumption since the car seemed to run fine further into the Ride & Drive test loop. I was still impressed with the car’s manners on the street, aside from the stalling issue. Again, I still think of Coffeeman’s GT as a race car, so the fact that it rode and drove so well was dazzling. It far surpassed my expectations on the street, but the initial stall issue really hampered the car’s Ride & Drive score.

When I put Coffeeman’s GT through its paces on the street, it made me a believer—it could be a true representive of a King of the Street car. A Coyote engine mixed with a ProCharger F-1A supercharger on E85 with a Circle D-fortified 6R80 automatic transmission—that’s an amazing combination. The 6R80’s gear ratios keep the rpm in the sweet spot with all momentum going in the forward direction. With 22 pounds of boost on hand, that forward direction is at a rapid pace.

It was quickest in the Drag Race category with a 9.56 at 144 mph, just a tick quicker than Jon Lund’s GT. For Coffeeman, the King of the Street competition could’ve ended right then and he would’ve been happy. He was ecstatic that he beat Ken Bjonnes in Jon Lund’s car. The 9.56 secured him a 10 in the Drag Race category, and even with the stalling issue, it earned an 8 in the Ride & Drive, since it performed flawlessly otherwise.

For the Horsepower category, there were several competitors in the mid-800-rwhp range, and Coffeeman’s 833.91 number was at the lower part of the 800-rwhp club, so he scored a 6 in that category.

In the Engineering category, Editor Turner said, “Despite its sleeper personality, Coffeeman’s ride does percolate with some hidden engineering tricks that merit reward. First it’s been converted to an unseen air-to-water intercooler fed by an ice tank in the trunk. More importantly, its ProCharger operates with an electronically actuated wastegate—borrowed from the turbo world—to bleed off boost at low rpm, making the car more tractable on the dragstrip. It obviously works, as Joe topped the Drag Race category.” With those engineering feats, Editor Turner scored Coffeeman’s GT with a 7 in the Engineering category.

For Fit & Finish, Editor Turner was less impressed with the changes Coffeeman made to his GT. “Prior to KOTS, we had only seen Coffeeman’s GT under the knife at Power by the Hour or thrashing at the track. It was never so clean as it was in Bowling Green, but even though he dolled it up with a stripe, there were few surprises that you wouldn’t see on the dealer lot. Likewise, the interior was as-delivered save for the cage. Underhood it’s pretty industrial with a rat’s nest of vacuum hoses detracting from its simplicity,” Editor Turner said. As such, Editor Turner gave Coffeeman’s GT a 5 in Fit & Finish. For the Popular Vote, it seemed Coffeeman couldn’t perk up many votes, finishing almost at the bottom of the cup with a 5.

All in all, I think both Turner and I both came away impressed with Coffeeman’s GT, and with a new respect for him and Power by the Hour Performance in Boynton Beach, Florida. In the end though, it was the small details that came back to haunt him and his overall score.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain

Block
Ford Racing Aluminator

Crankshaft
Ford Racing Aluminator

Rods
Manley Performance H-beam w/ ARP rod bolts

Pistons
Mahle forged

Camshafts
Ford Racing Aluminator

Cylinder heads
Ford Racing Aluminator

Intake manifold
Boss 302 w/ stock throttle body, and Pro-M mass air meter

Power Adder
ProCharger F-1A supercharger w/ 22 pounds of boost, a 4-in pulley, a Turbosmart wastegate, a Turbosmart E-boost 2 boost controller, and a Fluid Turbo Concepts intercooler

Fuel system
E85-compatible w/ Fore Innovations triple-pump hat with Walbro pumps, Fragola lines, Metco Motorsports rails, and Injector Dynamics 1,000cc injectors

Exhaust
American Racing Headers long-tubes w/ X-shape crossover pipe, and GT500 mufflers

Transmission
Circle D 6R80 automatic with Circle D 3,200-rpm stall converter, an Axle Exchange driveshaft, and a stock shifter

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ stock differential, axles, and 3.15 rear gear

Electronics

Engine management
Stock Copperhead w/ Lund Racing tune

Ignition
Stock w/ Brisk spark plugs

Gauges
Stock w/ Auto Meter boost, water temp, transmission temp, and wideband in a Speed of Sound A-pillar pod


Robert Chavis’ 2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

Horsepower: 5 (808.80)
Ride & Drive: 8
Engineering: 6
Fit & Finish: 7
Drag Race: 4 (13.51)
Popular Vote: 9
Final Score: 65

North Carolina’s Fastlane Motor-sports is a veteran of King of the Street, so when the guys told us about Robert Chavis’ ’13 Shelby GT500, we were intrigued. We were hesitant at first because the car was pretty stock except for a supercharger upgrade, but what swayed us was the chance to see how the latest Shelby would stack up against more modified Mustangs with perhaps smaller engine combinations—and let the chips fall where they may.

We really didn’t know a whole lot about Robert’s GT500 before the competition. We really only knew it was a ’13 GT500 with a Kenne Bell 3.6-liter supercharger. We didn’t know what color it was or anything, so when we showed up to the Beech Bend Amusement Park to meet everyone, we didn’t know Robert Chavis was right there with us from the outset.

I guess we thought Robert’s GT500 would look like every other ’13 GT500, but as you can see, that is definitely not the case. Robert decided to have his GT500 wrapped to show his Iroquois culture, specifically the Tuscarora and Meherrin nations. It’s safe to say we’ve never laid eyes on a Mustang with a wrap scheme like Robert’s, but that made his GT500 distinguishable from all the rest.

To hear Robert talk about his GT500 and his pride in his heritage, we should all be so proud of our ancestry. The wrap on Robert’s GT500 traced the evolution of his descendants through time, and listening him speak of it, you can clearly hear the passion in his voice.He put that same passion into his GT500. Even though he had only owned the GT500 for a short time, the performance and exterior upgrades illustrate his desire to have a an awesome Mustang.

Fortunately, Robert started with the baddest Mustang to come from Ford in ... well, ever. The ’13 Shelby GT500 is the top of the heap. With 662 hp from the factory, a top speed of 200 mph, and 11-second quarter-mile times as delivered, the ’13 GT500 is an incredible vehicle already. Robert and Fastlane Motorsports have taken the car to the next level by adding a Kenne Bell 3.6-liter supercharger, a Snow Performance methanol kit, Steeda Autosports suspension goodies, and Vossen wheels. The engine enhancements added up to 808.80 hp on Holley Performance Products’ Dynojet.

To get 800 rwhp out of a Mustang with a simple supercharger and exhaust upgrade shows how far SVT has come with its engine development, and how far the aftermarket has come with product development. Remember when we were impressed when you could throw an aftermarket blower on a Terminator and get 500 rwhp?! We thought that was something! Today’s 800 rwhp is yesterday’s 500 rwhp.

When I sampled Robert’s GT500 on the Ride & Drive, it was pretty much what I expected, which was a ’13 GT500 with a couple extra hundred horsepower. The ’13 GT500 is an amazing vehicle. It’s long-legged, but with 800 hp at the wheels, it’s that much more enjoyable. With 3.73 gears out back in Robert’s GT500, its legs are a little shorter, but with a couple extra hundred horsepower, it doesn’t matter. Robert’s GT500 was fun to drive. My intial reaction was “It’s a blast to run the car through the gears.” Of course, 800 rwhp mixed with a six-speed is fun, that’s no secret, so it shouldn’t be a secret the car did well in the Ride & Drive category, scoring an 8. Since it made “just” 800 rwhp, it scored a 5 in the Horsepower category.

As for Editor Turner’s thoughts on Robert’s GT500, he was happy to see something different for a change. “I expected to see a stock GT500 and was pleasantly surprised to see that Robert Chavis really put a unique spin on his ’13 Shelby,” Editor Turner said. “The wrap might not be for everyone, but it is comprehensive and tells the story of his tribe. However, his decision to leave out the hood vents cost him some F&F points, as did the stock interior. The engine compartment was clean but the definition of a bolt-on combination,” summing up his Fit & Finish thoughts. For the car’s unique look, Editor Turner rewarded Robert’s GT500 with a 7 in Fit & Finish.

“On the engineering side of things, Robert’s car suffered from the bolt-on nature of his modifications, but the addition of the boost-actuated Snow system and the complete Steeda suspension lifted him a bit above average,” Editor Turner added. Simply put, from an engineering standpoint, his GT500 was largely a stock car, albeit a great starting point, but when other cars had built engines and transmissions, the bolt-on nature of Robert’s combo hurt. That’s not a knock against Robert, and especially not against Fastlane. It did an amazing job in a short time on a car that hadn’t totally been figured out from a tuning standpoint. We wonder what Robert’s GT500 would be like with a built engine, a larger blower, and perhaps some nitrous. Goodness gracious, can you imagine?! However, 800 rwhp is just about perfect for this author’s money. However, Editor Turner’s discerning tastes gave Robert’s GT500 a 6 in the Engineering category.

What also hampered Robert’s final score was his lack of time at the wheel of his GT500. A 13.51 at 120 mph spelled out a distinct lack of traction, which we knew was going to be an issue. Therefore, Robert brought up the rear with a 4 in the Drag Race category. However, he rebounded in the Popular Vote with a 9 in that category. It seemed the car’s wrap struck a chord with our Facebook poll voters, and it held the voting lead for quite awhile until Jon Lund’s GT took over late in the game.

5.0 Tech Specs

Engine and Drivetrain

Block
Trinity aluminum

Crankshaft
Stock ’13 GT500

Rods
Stock ’13 GT500

Pistons
Stock ’13 GT500

Camshafts
Stock ’13 GT500

Cylinder heads
Stock ’13 GT500

Intake manifold
Kenne Bell Mammoth w/ Kenne Bell twin 75mm throttle body

Power Adder
Kenne Bell 3.6-liter supercharger w/ 22 pounds of boost and a Snow Performance Stage II methanol kit

Fuel system
Dual pumps w/ Fastlane Motorsports fuel rails and 72-lb/hr injectors

Exhaust
Kooks long-tubes w/ X-shape crossover pipe, and stock ’13 GT500 mufflers

Transmission
Stock ’13 GT500 and a carbon-fiber driveshaft

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in w/ stock Torsen differential, stock axles, 3.73 gears

Electronics

Engine management

Stock computer w/ an SCT/Fastlane Motorsports tune

Ignition
Stock

Gauges
Stock, Snow Performance methanol heads-up indicator


Domenic Didonato’s 2012 Shelby GT500

Horsepower: 3 (724.97)
Ride & Drive: 9
Engineering: 5
Fit & Finish: 5
Drag Race: 6 (10.85)
Popular Vote: 4
Final Score: 57.5

We owe Domenic Didonato a debt of gratitude for coming out of the bullpen, if you will, at the last second to enter the King of the Street. When only six cars showed up Thursday morning, Evolution Performance’s Fred Cook told us about Domenic’s ’12 GT500, which was at Beech Bend for the NMRA event. Even though Domenic was there to race, Fred assured us his GT500 was an ideal candidate for the King of the Street, and once we laid eyes on it, we couldn’t have agreed more.

What intrigued us the most was that Domenic’s GT500 was similar in combination to Editor Turner’s own GT500—and if you see Turner’s GT500 at the dragstrip, call the cops ’cause it’s been stolen. So Domenic’s GT500 gave us an idea of how Editor Turner’s GT500 would do in the King of the Street. First off, Domenic’s GT500 is even more menacing thanks to its black-with-white-stripes paint scheme combined with Weld RT big n’ littles. The camera loved getting up close and personal with Domenic’s GT500. If we didn’t know any better, we would’ve thought he had purposely planned to compete in the King of the Street, the car is that clean.

We ran into the first snag with Domenic’s GT500 when it was his turn for the Ride & Drive. Since his GT500 is set up for the drags, it features a fixed racing seat. That wouldn’t be so bad, except that Domenic is several inches shorter than your author. We can’t hold this little snag against Domenic in this instance since he was a last-second King of the Street addition. However, getting into Domenic’s GT500 was a lesson in origami. I literally had to fold myself into the driver seat and the seating position was less than desirable. However, once underway, Domenic’s GT500 was as close to perfect on the Ride & Drive as one could expect. Even with the big ’n’ littles, the car was tight and nimble, handling the Ride & Drive test loop with ease. Perhaps the only nit-picking drawback was the slightly stiff clutch, but besides that, Domenic’s GT500 had perfect driveability, earning a 9 in the Ride & Drive.

After the Ride & Drive success, Domenic’s GT500 didn’t have much success. Since his GT500 features the same basic combination as Editor Turner’s GT500, we suspected it would make around 700 rwhp on Holley’s Dynojet, and we were right. Domenic’s two Dynojet runs were within a few horsepower of each other, with its best number at 724.97. Unfortunately, that placed Domenic at the bottom of the scale, which scored him a 4 in the Horsepower category.

In the Engineering category, Editor Turner knew exactly what he was looking at. He was basically looking at his GT500. “There were few surprises on the engineering side of things. I know as well as anyone that the marriage of a TVS and a 5.4 is a fruitful one. As effective as it is, I look for the extra mile at KOTS, especially from GT500s. To move above the average, you have to tweak the established combinations beyond expectations. Unfortunately, my beloved TVS combo had to set the baseline this year,” Editor Turner said. He had hoped a combination like his own would perform better at the King of the Street, but he also knew the reality of the situation. Therefore, he was left to score Domenic’s GT500 with a 5 in Engineering.

Likewise, Editor Turner was equally as giving in the Fit & Finish category for Domenic’s GT500. Since it is mostly configured for the dragstrip, Turner liked that the car stuck to the basics, but he also added, “It’s the frills that score you F&F style points at KOTS. Rolling on Welds, it’s menacing, but otherwise stock-appearing under the hood. Inside, a cage and racing seats are its only mods, and under the hood it’s an all-too-familiar combination. It’s exactly what you’d expect from a track-oriented GT500.” Hence, Domenic’s GT500 also scored a 5 in Fit & Finish.

On the track is where we figured Domenic would gain some ground, and although that was true, with the other more powerful, well sorted out combinations also competing, Domenic was still toward the bottom in the Drag Race category. He was able to run a 10.85 at 121 mph, which gave him a 6 in the Drag Race category. In the Popular Vote, we can only surmise his GT500’s stock exterior nature kept Domenic from mustering many backers, scoring a measly 4 in that category.

Even if he didn’t come to Beech Bend that weekend to compete in the King of the Street, Domenic and his GT500 held his own. Hopefully he’ll want to compete again in 2013 since we hear he also has a more powerful, well-appointed GT500. We can’t wait.

5.0 Tech Specs
Engine and Drivetrain

Block
Stock ‘12 GT500

Crankshaft
Stock ’12 GT500

Rods
Stock ’12 GT500

Pistons
Stock ’12 GT500

Camshafts
Stock ’12 GT500

Cylinder heads
Stock ’12 GT500

Intake manifold
Ford Racing dual 65mm throttle body, JLT Performance 123mm Big Air intake

Power Adder
Ford Racing 2.3L TVS supercharger, Evolution Performance 2.6-in supercharger pulley and dual-bearing auxiliary idler, ATI 15-percent overdrive balancer

Fuel system
E85-compatible Fore Innovations Billet hat w/ dual 405 pumps, 205-lb/hr injectors, Evolution Performance fuel rails

Exhaust
American Racing Headers long-tube headers w/ off-road X-shape crossover, stock axle-back

Transmission
Stock ’12 GT500, Spec P-Trim clutch, Barton shifter

Rearend
Stock 8.8-in, Torsen differential, 4.10 gears

Electronics
Engine management
Stock computer

Ignition
Stock

Gauges
Stock